• How the unemployment rate has changed in all 50 states from April to May

    Vermont saw an 11.5 percent decrease in its unemployment rate from April to May this year, the highest change rate of any state. Meanwhile, Montana saw a 3.1 percent increase in its unemployment rate, according to June 16 data from WalletHub based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Ensuring your workforce is future-ready

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  • Nurses resign after California hospital cuts part-time work

    Some nurses have left Watsonville (Calif.) Community Hospital after the hospital eliminated most of its part-time roles, multiple local sources have reported. 
  • Job-based optimism trends up in healthcare

    Healthcare workers are gaining confidence in their ability to find or hold a job — but such optimism is dropping in most other fields, according to recent data from LinkedIn. 
  • Industry report: How AI is powering healthcare executive searches

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  • Northwell Health looks to untapped resource — alumni — for talent

    New Hyde Park, N.Y.-based Northwell Health believes once an employee, always a member of the Northwell family. With that in mind, it introduced the Alumni Network June 15, an online group that will enable tens of thousands of former Northwell employees to reconnect and stay in touch.
  • Healthcare workers value pay, 'a recipe for disaster'

    Healthcare employees are placing a premium on pay and stability in their jobs, and many feel their current employers aren't doing enough, according to Grant Thornton's State of Work in America survey.
  • Top 9 reasons healthcare workers quit

    Healthcare organizations must make sure employees feel valued and well-paid to retain them, according to Grant Thornton's State of Work in America report.
  • Employment of physicians, by state

    An estimated 305,260 physicians are employed in the U.S. who are not anesthesiologists, cardiologists, dermatologists, emergency medicine physicians, family medicine physicians, general internal medicine physicians, neurologists, obstetricians and gynecologists, or pathologists. 
  • Employment of pharmacy technicians, by state

    An estimated 453,630 pharmacy technicians are employed in the U.S. According to the most recent data shared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Florida is the state with the highest employment level of pharmacy technicians, followed by California and Texas.
  • Employment of CRNAs, by state

    An estimated 46,540 nurse anesthetists are employed in the U.S. According to the most recent data shared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Florida is the state with the highest employment level of CRNAs, followed by Michigan and Ohio.
  • Employment of NPs, by state

    About 258,230 nurse practitioners are employed in the U.S., and California is the state with the highest employment level of NPs, according to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
  • Gen Z: Paid time off is most important when choosing a new job

    It has been established that Generation Z values flexibility in the workplace more than previous generations, but new research shows just what kind of freedom they value most — and indicates that they prioritize it over health insurance. 
  • Employment of PAs, by state

    About 140,900 physician assistants are employed in the U.S., and California is the state with the highest employment level in PAs, according to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
  • White-collar workers hit hard by unemployment

    White-collar jobs have become increasingly elusive, leaving more people unemployed in sectors once considered secure, according to recent reporting from The Wall Street Journal. 
  • 60% of employees worldwide are 'quiet quitting'

    Workers are still more stressed than they've ever been, which is reflected in their on-the-job engagement levels: the term "quiet quitting," coined in 2022, continues to accurately reflect employees' mindsets, according to a recent Gallup poll. 
  • New Jersey lifts COVID-19 vaccine rule for hospital workers

    New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed an executive order lifting the state's COVID-19 vaccine requirement for workers at regulated healthcare settings, his office said in a June 12 news release. 
  • Alabama governor signs Physician Workforce Act into law

    With an eye on addressing the physician shortage in Alabama, Gov. Kay Ivey signed the Physician Workforce Act into law, according to a June 12 report in The Shelby County Reporter.
  • New York to consider rule calling for 1 nurse for every 2 critical care patients in hospitals

    A proposed regulation drafted by the New York State Department of Health requires hospitals to assign at least one nurse for every two patients in critical care units.
  • Employment of RNs, by state

    About 3.1 million registered nurses are employed in the U.S., and California is the state with the highest employment level in RNs, according to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
  • A disturbing year for violence against global healthcare

    2022 was the worst year on record for acts of violence against healthcare facilities and personnel on the global level, according to a new report from the Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition. 
  • Penn Medicine's telehealth program for employees cut care costs 23%

    Philadelphia-based Penn Medicine lowered care costs for employees by establishing a 24/7, copayment-free telemedicine program, according to a study published June 9 in the American Journal of Managed Care.  
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