Becker's Clinical Leadership & Infection Control

March/April 2018 Issue of Beckers Infection Control and Clinical Quality

ICCQ March 2018 cover

ON THE COVER

Nuclear Energy... and Healthcare? What Health Systems Can Learn About Patient Safety from other high-risk industries
The nuclear and healthcare industries share much in common. Both operate in high-risk environments and place great priority on workplace safety. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

This Seattle Hospital Aims to Get All Sepsis Patients on Antibiotics Within 3 Hours
Seattle-based Harborview Medical Center relies on an automated sepsis-detection system — supported by the cohesive integration of nurses and technology — that seeks to treat potential sepsis patients within three hours of detection, reports NPR. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Northwell Rolls Out One-of-a-Kind Flu Tracker for Long Island, NYC
The nuclear and healthcare industries share much in common. Both operate in high-risk environments and place great priority on workplace safety. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

INFECTION CONTROL & PATIENT SAFETY

Patient Safety Issues Could Drive $383B in Healthcare Costs by 2022
By 2022, avoidable adverse patient safety events across the U.S. and Western Europe, including healthcare-associated infections, sepsis and diagnostic errors, could cost $383.7 billion, according to a Frost & Sullivan analysis. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Milwaukee Hospital Suspends Employees for Leaving Homeless Patient in Cold
Administrators at Milwaukee-based Aurora Sinai Medical Center suspended an undisclosed number of employees Tuesday after staff discharged a mentally ill homeless man clothed in only a hospital gown and scrub pants on Monday, according to report from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Flu-Related Hospitalizations Reach 10-Year High: 4 Things to Know
The number of Americans hospitalized for influenza has increased to the highest levels in nearly 10 years, according to the CDC's most recent flu update published Friday. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Aspen Valley Hospital Suspends Elective Surgeries Over Sterilization Issues
By 2022, avoidable adverse patient safety events across the U.S. and Western Europe, including healthcare-associated infections, sepsis and diagnostic errors, could cost $383.7 billion, according to a Frost & Sullivan analysis. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

135 Surgical Patients Exposed to Unsterile Equipment at Missouri Hospital
Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.-based General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital on Feb. 5 confirmed 135 patients were treated with laparoscopy equipment that was not properly sterilized. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

University Hospitals Nurse Fired for Calling in Sick With Flu: 4 Things to Know
Theresa Puckett, RN, a temporary nurse at Cleveland-based University Hospitals, was fired for taking two sick days after catching the flu, reports WSMV. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

DMC Children’s Hospital Brings Sterile Processing In-House
Detroit Medical Center's Children's Hospital of Michigan is constructing a 250,000-square-foot critical care tower, which will house its own sterile processing department, according to DMC Children's CEO Luanne Thomas Ewald. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Hospital Toilet Flushing During Patient Care Can Lead to Spread of Pathogens
A study, published in Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control, quantified the particles and bioaerosols produced from flushing a hospital toilet during routine patient care. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Nuclear Energy... and Healthcare? What Health Systems Can Learn About Patient Safety From Other High-Risk Industries
The nuclear and healthcare industries share much in common. Both operate in high-risk environments and place great priority on workplace safety. However, the concept of zero harm — often considered an unwavering standard in other high-risk industries, like nuclear energy — remains difficult to achieve in the healthcare arena. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 


PATIENT EXPERIENCE

Should Providers Ask All Patients About Sexual Orientation? 4 Insights
Two health experts debated whether providers should ask all patients about their sexual orientation after the National Health Service of England released guidelines late last year arguing these questions could improve services for non-heterosexual patients.
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85% of Patients Value Compassion Over Cost in Healthcare: 4 Findings
Despite the rising costs of healthcare and long wait times for appointments, patients and physicians rank compassion as the most important aspect of healthcare today, according to a HealthTap survey. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Epic Tops KLAS' List of 9 Best Patient Portals
Research firm KLAS ranked Epic's MyChart as the top patient portal in its 2018 "Best in KLAS: Software & Services" report.
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Cancer Patients Want Say in Where They Die: 4 Things to Know
Patients diagnosed with cancer want their physicians to ask them where they prefer to receive end-of-life care, according to a study published in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Why First Impressions of Providers Matter More for New Patients: 4 Insights
Patients who felt their medical providers and staff were competent during a first visit were more likely to continue to visit the practice, according to a report by athenaInsight.
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Physicians Hugging Patients — Empathetic or Inappropriate?
A strong patient-physician relationship requires a certain level of trust and intimacy, but how much intimacy is too much? CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Viewpoint: Physicians Should Be Permitted to Help Patients Die
Haider Warraich, MD, a fellow in cardiology at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., argues physicians should help terminally ill patients to die on their own terms in an opinion piece published in The Boston Globe.
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These 3 Clinics Accept Bitcoin Payments, But See Little Demand From Patients
Bitcoin is not widely accepted at brick-and-mortar businesses, but a small number of healthcare clinics across the nation have started accepting the cryptocurrency, according to STAT. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Do Patients Trust Medical Leaders? 6 Things to Know
Only 34 percent of Americans express a high level of confidence in medical leaders today, compared to more than three-fourths of Americans in 1966, a mistrust that can have significant consequences during national emergencies and epidemics, The New York Times reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 


EXECUTIVE BRIEFING

Hospital Wastewater Systems Are a Reservoir for Drug-Resistant Bacteria: 5 Study Findings
Hospital wastewater systems are a breeding ground for drug-resistant bacteria, a new study conducted by the National Institutes of Health suggests. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

WHO: 5 Most Common Antibiotic-Resistant Infections
The World Health Organization released new antibiotic resistance surveillance data Monday, confirming widespread antibiotic resistance around the world. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Most Infection Specialists Don’t Recommend the Shortest Possible Antibiotic Course
A study, published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, examined whether infection specialists tend to advise shorter durations of antibiotic therapy. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Mercy Health Pilots ‘Super Scrubs’ Across System
Cincinnati-based Mercy Health is one of the first health systems in the nation to pilot the use of "super scrubs" systemwide to prevent the spread of bacteria during this year's potent flu season, according to WTOL-11. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Researchers Leverage Forgotten Antibiotic in Battle Against Superbugs
A largely ignored antibiotic discovered 40 years ago could provide new treatments for infections with drug-resistant bacteria, according to a study published in the journal Cell Chemical Biology. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

CDC Map Outlines National Progress Against Antibiotic Resistance
The CDC on Wednesday updated its Antibiotic Resistance Investment Map, which offers an interactive breakdown of monetary investment and progress in the fight against superbugs. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Stewardship Program Linked to 11.4% Drop in Patients Treated With Antimicrobials
An antimicrobial stewardship program implemented in an intensive care unit at a general hospital in Barcelona, Spain, helped significantly reduce the use of antimicrobials, according to a study published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

Chlorhexidine Gluconate-Based Hand Sanitizers More Effective Than Ethanol-Only
A study, published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, compared the antimicrobial activity of two hand hygiene products — ethanol plus chlorhexidine gluconate and ethanol only — when used in an intensive care unit. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE


QUALITY IMPROVEMENT & MEASUREMENT

VA Offers Higher Quality End-of-Life Care Than Medicare: 5 Things to Know
Cancer patients who rely on Veterans Affairs facilities receive higher quality end-of-life care than cancer patients who receive care paid for by traditional Medicare, according to a study published in Health Affairs. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

The Joint Commission Now Cites Individual Hand Hygiene Noncompliance as Deficiency
The Joint Commission announced that starting Jan. 1 if surveyors observe any individual failures to perform hand hygiene in the process of direct patient care, it will be cited as a deficiency. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Google Predicts Medical Outcomes With 46B Data Points, Arti cial Intelligence: 5 Things to Know
A team of Google researchers developed an artificial intelligence system that predicts medical outcomes like mortality and readmissions based on patient data held in EHRs, Quartz reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Emory Researchers Use AI to Predict Sepsis Onset in ICUs
A team of researchers from Atlanta-based Emory University developed an artificial intelligence algorithm to predict a patient's likelihood of developing sepsis in real-time, according to a study published in the journal Critical Care Medicine. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Penn State Launches Big Data Project to Drive Population Health, Personalized Medicine
A team of researchers at Pennsylvania State University are laying the groundwork for large-scale population health investigations through a new data project, the university announced Feb. 6. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Research Intermountain’s Precision Genomics Arm Begins Tests to Identify Hereditary Cancer Genes Ochsner Integrates AI Into Patient Care
Salt Lake City-based Intermountain Healthcare plans to offer hereditary cancer gene panels through the Intermountain Precision Genomics Core Laboratory in St. George, Utah, the health system announced Feb. 1. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

2 Ways AI is Helping Fight the Flu This Season and Those to Come
Researchers are using artificial intelligence and machine learning to find better ways to protect people from this year's particularly aggressive flu season, according to NBC News. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Harvard Spinout Creates AI Coach to Field Patient Questions Between Medical Visits
Memora Health, a startup based in the Harvard Innovation Labs at Cambridge, Mass.-based Harvard University, developed an artificial intelligence-powered virtual coach to answer patients' questions, AmericanInno reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

This Seattle Hospital Aims to Get Sepsis Patients on Antibiotics Within 3 Hours — Here's How
Seattle-based Harborview Medical Center relies on an automated sepsis-detection system — supported by the cohesive integration of nurses and technology — that seeks to treat potential sepsis patients within three hours of detection, reports NPR. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

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