Becker's Clinical Leadership & Infection Control

January / February Clinical Leadership & Infection Control Issue

Jan_Feb Quality Issue.JPG

January / February Clinical Leadership & Infection Control Issue

 

ON THE COVER 

Most patients don’t disclose relevant information to clinicians, study finds

Anywhere from 60 to 80 percent of patients don’t share relevant health information with their clinicians, a study published in JAMA Network Open found. CLICK TO CONTINUE

HAIs, sepsis and more: 8 leaders share patient safety goals for 2019

Patient safety is a top priority for healthcare executives, with leaders constantly looking for new ways to achieve a safe and positive healthcare experience for all patients. CLICK TO CONTINUE

How Atrium Health sustains a 4% reduction in readmissions annually

Charlotte, N.C.-based Atrium Health saw significant improvements in readmission rates after implementing a new population health model, among other strategic initiatives, the health system told Becker’s via email. CLICK TO CONTINUE

What hospitals can do to avoid disrupting patients’ sleep

Although physicians and nurses often have to wake patients at odd hours for medication and tests, hospitals can employ strategies that minimize patient sleep disruptions that hinder recovery, The New York Times reported. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Viewpoint: How hospital workplace bullying harms patient safety

Bullying, harassment and other unprofessional behaviors in the hospital workplace can jeopardize patient safety, two authors wrote in The Conversation. CLICK TO CONTINUE

‘Higher than expected’ contamination rates found with duodenoscopes after reprocessing

Preliminary results of the FDA’s surveillance studies of duodenoscopes identified "higher-than-expected" contamination rates after reprocessing. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Geisinger surgery pilot cut lengths of stay in half

Danville, Pa.-based Geisinger Health System’s surgical redesign program, ProvenRecovery, cut hospital stays for some surgery patients in half since launching almost two years ago, the health system said. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

INFECTION CONTROL & PATIENT SAFETY

Why some hospitals are deploying giant ‘Roombas’ in fight against HAIs

Hospitals reported a significant decrease in seven types of healthcare-associated infections in 2016, according to the CDC’s 2016 Healthcare-Associated Infection Progress Report; however, 99,000 Americans still die each year from HAIs. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Partners mandates flu shots for all 74K employees

Boston-based Partners HealthCare is requiring all 74,000 employees to receive flu shots for the first time, reported The Boston Globe. CLICK TO CONTINUE

2 people test positive for hep B after sterilization breach at New Jersey clinic

Lawyers for two former patients of Saddle Brook, N.J.-based HealthPlus Surgery Center, which the state temporarily shut down due to poor sterilization practices, said their clients tested positive for hepatitis B, reported the North Jersey Record. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Stethoscopes carry broad range of bacteria — even after cleaning

Stethoscopes used in hospitals often contain a broad range of bacteria, according to a study published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Can vitamin-steroid cocktail cure sepsis? Trial aims to find out

After a physician reported a mix of vitamin C, thiamine and steroids could treat sepsis, a clinical trial is underway to see if it can cure the potentially life-threatening condition, according to NPR. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Flu shot rates on the rise for kids, adults

The number of children and adults vaccinated for the flu as of mid-November 2018 increased significantly compared to 2017, according to CDC data released Dec. 14. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Glove use may thwart hand hygiene, particularly among nurses

The use of examination gloves in hospitals may present a barrier to hand hygiene, especially among nurses, according to a study cited by Healio. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Machine learning can help predict hospital infection risk, study finds

A machine learning algorithm can be used to predict patients’ risk of contracting a potentially deadly hospital infection, according to a study published in Nature Communications and covered by Digit. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Hand hygiene key to mitigating S. aureus transmission in the OR

A study published in the American Journal of Infection Control examined protocols for preventing the spread of Staphylococcus aureus pathogens in the operating room. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Viewpoint: How hospital workplace bullying harms patient safety

Bullying, harassment and other unprofessional behaviors in the hospital workplace can jeopardize patient safety, two authors wrote in The Conversation. CLICK TO CONTINUE

‘Higher than expected’ contamination rates found with duodenoscopes after reprocessing

Preliminary results of the FDA’s surveillance studies of duodenoscopes identified "higher-than-expected" contamination rates after reprocessing. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Indiana VA hospital unveils building for sterilizing surgical tools

Six years after the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs temporarily suspended services at its Fort Wayne, Ind.-based hospital for patient care issues, the hospital unveiled a building addition for sterilizing surgical instruments and renovated inpatient areas, according to The Journal Gazette. CLICK TO CONTINUE

20 hospitals win AORN’s Go Clear Gold Award for eliminating surgical smoke

The Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses announced its 2018 AORN Go Clear Gold Award recipients. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Why this family heirloom could reveal how 1918 flu pandemic spread

Human tissue slides passed down to descendants of a British military physician and shared with researchers could help unearth new information about the 1918 Spanish flu, reported STAT. CLICK TO CONTINUE

HAIs, sepsis and more: 8 leaders share patient safety goals for 2019

Patient safety is a top priority for healthcare executives, with leaders constantly looking for new ways to achieve a safe and positive healthcare experience for all patients. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Firing of St. Louis nurse for violating mandatory flu shot policy sparks protest

A nurse was fired for violating St. Louis-based Mercy Hospital South’s policy requiring a flu shot, sparking a protest outside the hospital, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Joint Commission: 9 ways to prevent flu transmission in hospitals

The Joint Commission is calling on healthcare organizations to help employees understand their responsibility to protect themselves and patients from the flu in a Quick Safety advisory notice released Nov. 28. CLICK TO CONTINUE

UV disinfection linked to lower C. diff rates

A study published in the American Journal of Infection Control examined whether the addition of an ultraviolet disinfection step after terminal cleaning can help reduce Clostridium difficile infection rates. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

PATIENT EXPERIENCE

How virtual reality is helping physicians treat anxious patients: 5 notes reality is helping physicians treat anxious patients: 5 notes

A range of businesses — from airlines to spas to dentist offices — are beginning to use virtual reality to help employees and customers relax, CNN reported. CLICK TO CONTINUE

How this Intermountain nurse comforts deceased patients’ families

A registered nurse at Salt Lake City-based Intermountain Medical Center is responsible for spearheading an initiative to comfort the families of patients who died at the hospital’s respiratory intensive care unit, reported KSL TV. CLICK TO CONTINUE

60% of older patients don’t want to discuss life expectancy, survey finds

Most older patients do not wish to discuss life expectancy with their physicians, according to a survey published in Annals of Family Medicine. CLICK TO CONTINUE

What hospitals can do to avoid disrupting patients’ sleep

Although physicians and nurses often have to wake patients at odd hours for medication and tests, hospitals can employ strategies that minimize patient sleep disruptions that hinder recovery, The New York Times reported. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Patient experience key to driving brand loyalty, report finds

Patient experience is five times more likely to influence patients’ brand loyalty than traditional marketing strategies used by health systems, according to a report from Press Ganey. CLICK TO CONTINUE

The problem with patient surveys

Patient satisfaction is an important part of hospital operations, but hospital leaders should consider the nuances of measuring patient experience before acting on survey results, according to a blog post on the AMA Wire. CLICK TO CONTINUE

94% of patients expect their provider to tell them about bill payment options, survey finds

Patients are increasingly focused on their financial experience, according to the ClearBalance 2018 healthcare consumerism study. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Study: Surgery complications don’t affect patient satisfaction

Patient satisfaction with surgeon care does not appear to be linked to whether or not they experienced complications after an operation, a study published in Surgery found. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Most patients don’t disclose relevant information to clinicians, study finds

Anywhere from 60 to 80 percent of patients don’t share relevant health information with their clinicians, a study published in JAMA Network Open found. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Why Mount Sinai opened a 'man cave'

New York City-based Mount Sinai Health System unveiled a "man cave"-themed waiting room at the urology department's practice in midtown Manhattan to encourage male patients to get screened for prostate cancer. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Care decision-makers often overly confident about loved ones’ treatment wishes

Surrogates — or individuals responsible for making medical decisions on patients’ behalf — are often overly confident in their ability to make treatment decisions in line with a patient’s wishes, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Physician viewpoint: We must stop blaming patients for unhealthy lifestyle choices

Physicians must abandon the mindset that patients who practice unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, are to blame for their illnesses or cancer, Monica Bhargava, MD, an Oakland, Calif.-based pulmonary and critical care physician, wrote in an op-ed published by The Washington Post. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE & STEWARDSHIP

Amoxicillin prescription rates low for children’s infections, study finds

Researchers at the St. George’s University of London ran a global comparison of antibiotic use and found few physicians prescribe amoxicillin to treat common childhood infections and instead use antibiotics for specific infections, according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Does antibiotic treatment duration matter for hospitalized patients with Gram-negative bacteremia?

A study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases examined the duration of antibiotic treatment for hospitalized patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Non-children’s hospitals fall short when treating kids for pneumonia, study finds

Researchers performed a retrospective analysis to investigate how hospitals adhere to the national guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia and found only 27 percent of pediatric patients were prescribed the recommended antibiotics at non-children’s hospitals, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Northwestern, USC, Teladoc to study antibiotic stewardship in telehealth

Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., and the University of Southern California’s Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics in Los Angeles partnered with Teladoc Health to study how physicians practicing remote care are prescribing antibiotics. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Bedside flu diagnosis in pediatric ED reduced antibiotic treatment by 70%

A study published in Clinical Microbiology and Infection shows that the bedside use of a rapid influenza digital immunoassay among children in an emergency ward may help reduce costs and enhance antimicrobial stewardship strategy. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Many hospitals do not follow CDC's antibiotic recommendations for newborns, study shows

Significant gaps exist between CDC recommendations for improving antibiotic use practices and antibiotic stewardship programs for newborns, according to a study published in Pediatrics. CLICK TO CONTINUE

ED crowding linked to delayed antibiotics for sepsis, study finds

Overcrowding in the emergency department could be a barrier to the early administration of antibiotics for sepsis, according to a study published in Annals of Emergency Medicine. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Investing $2 per person in antibiotic stewardship annually could thwart superbugs

The world could prevent 75 percent of deaths linked to antibiotic resistance by spending just $2 per person annually on antibiotic stewardship measures, according to a report from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. CLICK TO CONTINUE

This insect could help the fight against antibiotic resistance

Researchers discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which an insect-derived antibiotic kills Gram-negative bacteria, which could aid in the creation of new antibiotics, according to a study published in Science Advances. CLICK TO CONTINUE

6 most common elements of infection control interventions for 3 drug resistant bacteria

A study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases examined infection prevention and control interventions for three drug-resistant bacteria present at inpatient facilities. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Survey: 81% of Americans concerned about antibiotic resistance

Eighty-one percent of Americans are concerned about the implications of antibiotic resistance on infection treatment, according to a survey commissioned by Research!America in collaboration with the Infectious Disease Society of America. CLICK TO CONTINUE

5 hospitals earn CDC grants to develop antibiotic resistance solutions

The CDC awarded more than $15 million to 41 private and academic investigators, including five hospitals, to pilot innovative solutions that protect patients from antibiotic resistance. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

QUALITY IMPROVEMENT & MEASUREMENT

Leapfrog Group announces 2018 Top Hospitals

Florida, California, New Jersey and Texas each saw 12 or more hospitals named recipients of The Leapfrog Group’s 2018 Top Hospitals award. CLICK TO CONTINUE

How Atrium Health sustains a 4% reduction in readmissions annually

Charlotte, N.C.-based Atrium Health saw significant improvements in readmission rates after implementing a new population health model, among other strategic initiatives, the health system told Becker’s via email. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Early intervention with infectious disease specialist linked to lower death rate

Patients who received early intervention with an infectious disease physician experienced lower mortality rates and shorter lengths of stay, according to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. CLICK TO CONTINUE

58% of nurses rate their hospital’s end-of-life care unfavorably, study finds

Most nurses — 58 percent — rate their hospital’s end-of-life care unfavorably, and they may hold the key to improving care quality, a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Florida children’s hospitals may have to post heart surgery death rates online

St. Petersburg, Fla.-based Johns Hopkins All Children’s and other children’s hospitals in Florida may have to publish mortality statistics about their heart surgery programs under a new state proposal, according to the Tampa Bay Times. CLICK TO CONTINUE

VA hospitals outperform peers in care quality, study finds

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals often demonstrate higher care quality ratings on Hospital Compare than non-VA hospitals in the same market, according to a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Low RN staffing levels linked to higher patient mortality risk

Increasing the number of unregistered nursing assistants used to care for hospitalized patients may not be a safe solution to the nationwide nursing shortage, according to a study published in BMJ Quality & Safety. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Top-ranked hospitals demonstrate worse readmission rates for heart failure, study finds

Top-ranked hospitals for heart care do not always demonstrate better patient outcomes than nonranked hospitals, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Geisinger surgery pilot cut lengths of stay in half

Danville, Pa.-based Geisinger Health System’s surgical redesign program, ProvenRecovery, cut hospital stays for some surgery patients in half since launching almost two years ago, the health system said. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Harmful medical errors fall 38% with improved provider-family communication, study finds

An intervention designed to standardize communication between clinicians and families during patient rounds led to a 38 percent reduction in harmful medical errors, according to a study published in the BMJ. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Tablets, inpatient portals linked to lower readmission rates

Offering patients access to an inpatient portal is correlated with lower 30-day readmission rates, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. CLICK TO CONTINUE

Study: Adverse events declining in VA hospitals

Veterans Health Administration medical centers saw a drop in reported adverse events in the operating room that were linked to patient harm, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open. CLICK TO CONTINUE

 

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