Becker's Clinical Leadership & Infection Control

July/August 2021 Issue of Becker's Clinical Leadership & Infection Control 

ON THE COVER

A secondhand crisis is spotlighting physicians' role as bearers of bad news
"You have cancer." For Pam Khosla, MD, decades of experience don't ease the burden that comes with saying those words.

How Atrium, Ochsner and 4 more systems are deciding to unmask patients and staff
As businesses lift mask mandates for fully vaccinated consumers, the healthcare industry has been untouched. As COVID-19 infection rates drop and vaccinations plateau, hospital leaders are determining what their mask mandates' next move is.

Did the pandemic stamp out nurse bullying? Not quite, 2 CNOs say
Ask any healthcare leader to name a point of pride during the pandemic, and many will likely say the immense collaboration, teamwork and support that emerged among front-line caregivers and clinical teams.

13 states skipped infection control surveys during pandemic, inspector general finds
Thirteen states ignored CMS recommendations and did not perform targeted infection control surveys to prepare for COVID-19 patients last year, HHS' Office of Inspector General said in a June 28 report.

The severe condition surfacing among some COVID-19 long-haulers
A little-known yet serious autonomic nervous system disorder is surfacing among an unknown number of COVID-19 long-haulers, or people who experience persistent or worsening symptoms long after the infection has cleared, Kaiser Health News reported June 1.

10 CNOs on the 1 word they’d use to describe their teams
In recognition of National Nurses Week, Becker's asked 10 chief nursing officers or nurse executives from health systems nationwide to share the one word they'd use to describe their nursing team over the past year.

Hospital leaders are losing physician trust — here's 4 tips to change that
Nearly a third of physicians lost trust in their hospital's organizational leadership during the pandemic. A 15-year study of 3,200 leaders found four ways for CEOs to earn and retain trust from their staff, according to a June 11 report by Harvard Business Review.

How Scripps, UCLA Health nipped spread of deadly fungus at start of pandemic
Two healthcare organizations in Southern California implemented comprehensive efforts to prevent the spread of a deadly fungus amid the early days of the pandemic, according to two case studies presented June 29 at the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology's virtual annual conference.

Unvaccinated MetroHealth staff must take weekly COVID-19 tests
Employees at Cleveland-based MetroHealth who are not vaccinated against COVID-19 will be required to undergo weekly coronavirus testing, the health system said.

1 in 7 COVID-19 patients require care for new condition after infection
About 1 in 7 adults with COVID-19 developed a new health issue that required medical care after recovering from the virus last year, according to a study published May 19 in The BMJ.

Joint Commission: Top 5 most challenging requirements for hospitals in 2020
The Joint Commission has collected data on compliance with standards, National Patient Safety Goals, and Accreditation and Certification Participation Requirements to identify trends surrounding challenging requirements.

America's physician shortage could hit 124,000 in 13 years
The U.S. could face a shortage of 37,800 to 124,000 physicians by 2034, according to new data released June 11 from the Association of American Medical Colleges.

How CMS ranked US News' 20 Honor Roll hospitals
CMS updated its Overall Hospital Quality Star Ratings April 28, and 11 of U.S. News & World Report's 2020-21 20 Honor Roll hospitals received a five-star rating.

'Gone are the days when organizations can just offer bonuses': How to competitively recruit, retain nurses
As the nation grapples with a nurse shortage heightened by the pandemic, healthcare organizations are struggling to recruit and retain nurses.

INFECTION CONTROL

COVID-19 immunity may last years, 2 studies suggest
COVID-19 immunity persists for at least a year, perhaps even a lifetime, according to two recent studies, The New York Times reported May 26.

Biopsy samples left in many gastrointestinal endoscopes after procedures, U of Utah Health finds
A new study suggests biopsy specimens are retained in gastrointestinal endoscopes about two-thirds of the time, reports Medscape.

First human case of H10N3 bird flu confirmed in China
Chinese health officials on June 1 confirmed the world's first known human infection from a strain of bird flu called H10N3, The New York Times reported.

How Scripps, UCLA Health nipped spread of deadly fungus at start of pandemic
Two healthcare organizations in Southern California implemented comprehensive efforts to prevent the spread of a deadly fungus amid the early days of the pandemic, according to two case studies presented June 29 at the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology's virtual annual conference.

13 states skipped infection control surveys during pandemic, inspector general finds
Thirteen states ignored CMS recommendations and did not perform targeted infection control surveys to prepare for COVID-19 patients last year, HHS' Office of Inspector General said in a June 28 report.

PATIENT SAFETY & OUTCOMES

Sanitation, safety complaints spur CMS probe of Michigan hospital
Following patient and staff complaints against Mount Clemens, Mich.-based McLaren Macomb Hospital, CMS has asked a licensing agency to investigate the hospital, state officials confirm to WXYZ.

VHA, Northwestern Medicine win Eisenberg patient safety, quality awards
The Joint Commission and National Quality Forum selected the Veterans Health Administration and Chicago-based Northwestern Medicine as winners of the John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award in two categories.

South Carolina organ network tied to fatal blood-type error under investigation, pressure to improve
We Are Sharing Hope SC is facing three lawsuits after physicians unknowingly gave three patients organs with incompatible blood types, reports The Post and Courier.

1 in 7 COVID-19 patients require care for new condition after infection
About 1 in 7 adults with COVID-19 developed a new health issue that required medical care after recovering from the virus last year, according to a study published May 19 in The BMJ.

Ear tubes don't prevent future infection, study suggests
Tympanostomy or ear tubes did not lower the rate of acute otitis media, or middle-ear infections, among children, compared to antibiotics, according to research published May 13 in The New England Journal of Medicine.

PATIENT & CAREGIVER EXPERIENCE

America's physician shortage could hit 124,000 in 13 years
The U.S. could face a shortage of 37,800 to 124,000 physicians by 2034, according to new data released June 11 from the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Stanford Health Care overhauls surveys
Stanford Health Care is giving its patient surveys a makeover, with revised questions and digital options for completion so patients can share feedback immediately.

Physicians see fewer recruiting offers
Fewer jobs are being offered to physicians in their final year of training in 2021 compared to previous years — likely because of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a survey released May 11.

AAPA responds to medical groups' opposition of rebrand
The American Association of Physician Assistants responded to resistance over its intent to rebrand the PA title to "physician associate" in a June 4 letter posted on its website.

Baptist Health rolls out mobile app to help patients navigate facilities
Baptist Health will deploy an interactive mobile wayfinding platform to help patients navigate the Jacksonville, Fla.-based health system, according to a June 2 news release.

QUALITY IMPROVEMENT & MEASUREMENT

Unneeded tests before low-risk surgeries common, Michigan study finds
Preoperative testing is often unnecessary for low-risk surgeries, but remains common practice at many hospitals in Michigan, according to a study published May 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

How Nebraska hospital cut patient falls in half
Kearney (Neb.) Regional Medical Center has cut its patient fall rate in half since launching a safety program last October, Kearney Hub reported June 10.

CDC: Heart disease, diabetes deaths rose in 2020
As COVID-19 spread through the U.S. in 2020, the death rates for heart disease and diabetes saw significant increases, according to data from the CDC's Mortality Dashboard.

NYC Health + Hospitals stops using 2 race-based clinical assessments
NYC Health + Hospitals will no longer perform two common diagnostic tests that use race-based calculations, the New York City-based health system said May 17.

How CMS ranked US News' 20 Honor Roll hospitals
CMS updated its Overall Hospital Quality Star Ratings April 28, and 11 of U.S. News & World Report's 2020-21 20 Honor Roll hospitals received a five-star rating.

Pediatric sepsis cases jumped during pandemic, study finds
Postoperative sepsis rates increased among children who were hospitalized early  in the pandemic, a study published June 1 in Hospital Pediatrics found.

NURSING SPOTLIGHT

The root of the nursing shortage problem and what Louisiana leaders are doing about it
As hospitals across the nation deal with nursing shortages, leaders across Louisiana are teaming up to combat root causes of the shortage, reports CBS affiliate WWL-TV.

11 best shoes for nurses, healthcare workers on their feet
Long-lasting comfort and support are crucial for nurses and healthcare professionals who are constantly on their feet.

Montana raises nurse pay by 17% at state hospital in effort to retain, recruit staff
The state health department is increasing entry-level nurse wages by 17 percent at Warm Springs-based Montana State Hospital in an attempt to boost recruitment and retention, reports The Montana Standard.

'We're expendable': Michigan nurses say PPE still stretched thin, staffing shortages affecting care
Many nurses at Michigan hospitals say some personal protective equipment is still in short supply and inadequate staffing is hindering best care practices, reports CW affiliate WWMT.

Ochsner, Terrebonne General invest $2M in Louisiana nursing school
Ochsner Health and Terrebonne General Health System are each investing $1 million in the expansion of nursing and other health programs at Schriever, La.-based Fletcher Technical Community College, reports The Lafourche Gazette.

Copyright © 2021 Becker's Healthcare. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy. Cookie Policy. Linking and Reprinting Policy.

 

Featured Whitepapers

Featured Webinars