KFF survey: 78% of public believes or is unsure about at least 1 COVID-19 falsehood

Listen
Text
  • Small
  • Medium
  • Large

Almost 80 percent of U.S. adults either believe or aren't sure about at least one of eight falsehoods about the COVID-19 pandemic or vaccines, and nearly one-third believe at least four of the falsehoods, a Kaiser Family Foundation survey published Nov. 8 found. 

KFF's latest Vaccine Monitor survey was conducted from Oct. 14-24 among a nationally representative random sample of 1,519 adults. 

The survey explored respondents' perceptions about eight common COVID-19-related falsehoods. 

Nine findings: 

1. Of the adults who have heard the false statement that the government is exaggerating the number of COVID-19 deaths, 38 percent believe it is true and 22 percent are not sure.

2. About 17 percent of respondents said they've heard pregnant women shouldn't get the vaccine and believe it to be true while another 22 percent are familiar with the statement and aren't sure if it's true. 

3. Eighteen percent of respondents said they have heard the government is intentionally hiding deaths tied to the COVID-19 vaccine and believe it is true and another 17 percent have heard the falsehood but aren't sure about it. 

4. Eight percent of respondents said they've heard the vaccines have been shown to cause infertility and believe it to be true while another 23 percent have heard the misconception and aren't sure if it's true. 

5. Of the adults who have heard ivermectin is a safe and effective COVID-19 treatment, 14 percent believe it is true. 

6. Fourteen percent of respondents have heard the vaccines can cause a COVID-19 infection and believe it's true while another 10 percent who have heard the falsehood aren't sure if it's true. 

7. Seven percent of respondents said they've heard the shots contain a microchip and believe the false statement and another 17 percent are familiar with the falsehood and aren't sure if it's true. 

8. About 8 percent of respondents have heard the vaccines can alter DNA and believe it's true and 13 percent are familiar with the statement and are unsure about it. 

9. Overall, unvaccinated adults (64 percent) were more likely to say they believe or are unsure about at least half of the eight misconceptions compared with vaccinated adults (19 percent). 

 

Copyright © 2022 Becker's Healthcare. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy. Cookie Policy. Linking and Reprinting Policy.

 

Featured Whitepapers

Featured Webinars