Lawmakers question safety of in-person MCAT

Two lawmakers are questioning the Association of American Medical Colleges' decision to maintain in-person testing for the Medical College Admission Test during the pandemic. 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., penned a letter to the association's President David Skorton, MD, about testing processes Sept. 1.

The lawmakers requested more information on how AAMC is protecting students during the eight-hour test, its process for responding to safety concerns or complaints and whether the association would consider allowing testing accommodations for students who share a household with someone at risk of severe COVID-19 illness. 

Many premedical students have called for the association to move the MCAT online this year, citing health and safety concerns. In early August, the American College of Physicians urged medical schools to waive the MCAT requirement for students seeking admission in 2021.

To view the full letter, click here.

More articles on physicians:
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