Depression plaguing young Americans, unpaid caregivers, survey finds

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About 40 percent of U.S. adults reported experiencing adverse mental health conditions, especially young people and unpaid caregivers, a new survey shows.

The survey findings, released by the CDC, include responses from 5,412 U.S. adults polled June 24-30.

Overall, 40.9 percent of respondents reported at least one adverse mental or behavioral health condition, including symptoms of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Nearly 11 percent reported having seriously considered suicide in the 30 days before participating in the survey.

At least one adverse mental or behavioral health symptom was reported by:

● 74.9 percent of respondents ages 18 to 24 years
● 66.6 percent of respondents who were unpaid caregivers for adults
● 54 percent of respondents who were essential workers
● 52.1 percent of respondents of Hispanic ethnicity

In addition, about 25 percent of respondents ages 18 to 24 years, 18 percent of Hispanic respondents and 15 percent of black respondents reported having seriously considered suicide in the month before the survey. About 30 percent of respondents who were unpaid caregivers and 21 percent of those who were essential workers also said they'd had suicidal thoughts in the previous 30 days.

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