Burnout at record high for many primary care clinicians, survey finds 

Nearly half of primary care clinicians reported that their burnout is at an all-time high, largely due to financial pressures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, a new survey found.

The Larry A. Green Center and Primary Care Collaborative surveyed 763 practicing clinicians in 49 states from June 12-15. Respondents represented a broad range of primary care specialties, practice settings and types. 

Five survey findings:

1. Forty-four percent of respondents reported high levels of personal burnout, and 48 percent reported high levels of office burnout.

2. Thirty-six percent said their physical well-being has suffered, while 45 percent said their psychological state has declined.

3. Sixty-three percent of respondents said they've had "severe" or "near severe" stress levels the last four weeks.

4. Thirty-nine percent said they've had to lay off or furlough staff members in the last month.

5. A quarter of respondents said they've skipped or deferred their salaries.

To view the full survey, click here.

Editor's note: This article was updated June 30 at 11:00 a.m. CDT.

More articles on integration and physician issues:
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