New Mexico hospital workers declare no confidence in CEO, allege mismanagement

An ad hoc group of staff providers at Rehoboth McKinley Christian Hospital in Gallup, N.M., took a vote of no confidence in CEO David Conejo on May 5, alleging Mr. Conejo created an unsafe working environment, Searchlight New Mexico reported.

The group, which sent a warning letter to the hospital board, also accuses the CEO of failing to effectively communicate, promoting a lack of transparency and poor financial management, according to the investigative news organization.

"The board members should understand that they are ultimately responsible for breaches in their fiduciary obligations to the hospital system by allowing the CEO to create unsafe working conditions," the healthcare workers wrote.

Workers have also reportedly expressed concerns about staffing levels. 

In response to the allegations, Rehoboth, a 60-bed facility, noted that it is the only hospital in Gallup that has not had COVID-19 cases at its substance abuse center, largely due to strict social distancing and temperature testing. 

"We are pleased to report our success in keeping the residents of our facility virus free," William Camorata, CEO of Gallup's Immediate Action Group which helps the homeless and director of behavioral special projects, Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services told Becker's Hospital Review.
 
Mr. Camorata said Gallup's homeless have also been helped during the pandemic by Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services' affiliation with the city's Community Outreach & Patient Empowerment. He said the city's COPE has partnered with local hospitals, hotels and motels to establish a care network and emergency housing for quarantine and social distancing to slow community spread in McKinley County and on the Navajo Nation.

The network, which ncludes Gallup's Ranch House Motel, Motel 6, Howard Johnson, the Days Inn, and the Gallup Indian Medical Center, can now accommodate 175 people. Mr. Camorata said the New Mexico Department of Public Health and the Navajo Nation provide funding for shelter and meals, while local donations provide transportation.

Note: This story was updated at 2:46 p.m. CDT May 12. 

 

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