COVID-19 by the numbers: 51 stats, dollar figures and dates for hospital leaders to know

In recent months, hospitals and health systems across the U.S. have made dramatic changes to quickly respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. To help provide a more detailed picture of the COVID-19 pandemic and response efforts, Becker's Hospital Review has compiled key stats, dollar figures and dates for hospital and health system leaders to know. 

COVID-19 relief aid 

Congress has allocated $175 billion in relief aid to hospitals and other healthcare providers to cover expenses or lost revenues tied to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The first $50 billion in funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act was delivered to hospitals in April. HHS distributed $30 billion based on Medicare fee-for-service reimbursements and another $20 billion based on hospitals' share of net patient revenue. 

In addition, HHS is sending $12 billion to 395 hospitals that provided inpatient care for 100 or more COVID-19 patients through April 10 and disbursing another $10 billion to hospitals, clinics and health centers in rural areas.

HHS recently provided a list of hospitals that received payments from the general distribution and rural targeted allocation of the provider relief fund as well as hospitals that received COVID-19 high-impact payments. 

Below are the 10 health systems that received the most funding from the general distribution and rural targeted allocation of the provider relief fund based on data updated May 12. Each health system received payments and agreed to the terms and conditions for receiving relief aid as of May 6. 

1. Dignity Health: $180.3 million 

2. NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital: $119 million 

3. Cleveland Clinic: $103.3 million 

4. Stanford Health Care: $102.4 million 

5. Intermountain Healthcare: $97.9 million 

6. Memorial Hermann Health System: $92.4 million

7. NYU Langone Hospitals: $92.1 million 

8. Sutter Health: $82.7 million 

9. County of Los Angeles: $80.8 million (County operates four hospitals) 

10. Hackensack Meridian Health: $76.8 million 

Below are the 10 hospitals that received the most funding from the $12 billion COVID-19 high-impact fund based on data updated May 8. 

1. Long Island Jewish Medical Center (New Hyde Park, N.Y.): $277.7 million 

2. Holy Name Medical Center (Teaneck, N.J.): $213.4 million 

3. Tisch Hospital (New York City): $203.2 million 

4. Montefiore Hospital-Moses Campus (New York City): $156.7 million 

5. Columbia University Irving Medical Center (New York City): $152.7 million 

6. NewYork-Presbyterian Queens (New York City): $143.3 million 

7. Mount Sinai Medical Center (New York City): $140.8 million 

8. Sandra Atlas Bass Heart Hospital (Manhasset, N.Y.): $137.5 million 

9. Maimonides Medical Center (New York City): $131.5 million 

10. Weill Cornell Medical Center (New York City): $118.6 million 

COVID-19 vulnerability 

Every state in the U.S. will be affected by COVID-19, but some are more vulnerable due to limited ability to mitigate and treat the virus, and to reduce its economic and social impacts, according to a COVID-19 vulnerability index created by the Surgo Foundation. 

The Surgo Foundation, a privately funded think tank, created an index that combines indicators specific to COVID-19 with the CDC's social vulnerability index, which measures the expected negative impact of disasters of any type. The Surgo Foundation's index takes into account factors that fall into one of several categories, including socioeconomic status, minority status, housing type, epidemiologic factors and healthcare system factors. Each state and the District of Columbia received a score in each category and an overall score, with a higher score indicating that the state is more vulnerable. Read more about the methodology here

Below are the 10 states with the highest composite scores based on the vulnerability index. 

1. Mississippi: 1 

2. Louisiana: 0.98 

3. Arkansas: 0.96 

4. Oklahoma: 0.94

5. Alabama: 0.92

6. West Virginia: 0.9 

7. New Mexico: 0.88 

8. Nevada: 0.86 

9. North Carolina: 0.84 

10. South Carolina: 0.82 

Where COVID-19 cases, deaths are decreasing most

An analysis from The New York Times based on county-level data shows some U.S. cities are seeing sustained decreases in COVID-19 cases and deaths.

Below are the top five metro areas where COVID-19 cases have decreased the most (relative to population) in the past week. The list reflects The New York Times' rankings as of May 13 at 6:30 a.m. CDT. 

1. Grand Island, Neb.
Change rate: -394 cases per 100,000 population 

2. Waterloo-Cedar Falls, Iowa
Change rate: -265 cases per 100,000 population 

3. Pine Bluff, Ark.
Change rate: -197 per 100,000 population 

4. New York City area
Change rate: -184 cases per 100,000 population 

5. Boston
Change rate: -139 cases per 100,000 population 

Below are the top five metro areas where COVID-19 deaths have decreased the most in the past week. 

1. Grand Island, Neb.
Change rate: -11.8 deaths per 100,000 population 

2. New York City area
Change rate: -11.1 deaths per 100,000 population 

3. Fairfield County (Conn.) 
Change rate: -9.7 deaths per 100,000 population 

4. Hartford, Conn. 
Change rate: -9.7 deaths per 100,000 population 

5. Springfield, Mass. 
Change rate: -9.5 deaths per 100,000 population 

States resuming elective surgeries 

Below are the states that have allowed or announced plans to allow healthcare providers to resume elective surgeries as of May 13. There are different restrictions in each state, which are detailed in executive orders and other documents from the state. 

April 22
California 
Texas 
Utah 

April 24
Oklahoma 

April 26
Colorado 

April 27
Arkansas
Indiana
Iowa 
Kentucky 
Louisiana
Mississippi 
Pennsylvania 

April 28
New York 
West Virginia 

April 30
Alabama 
Tennessee 

May 1
Arizona
Illinois 
Ohio
Oregon  
Virginia 

May 4
Alaska
Florida 
Nebraska

May 15
Vermont 

May 18 
Washington 

May 31
South Dakota 

More articles on leadership and management:
Trump administration will press Supreme Court to overturn ACA
Senior leader to leave FEMA amid pandemic
How COVID-19 has complicated the definition of 'expert'

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