San Francisco, New York state call monkeypox an emergency: 5 updates

New York state declared an imminent threat and San Francisco issued a state of emergency over monkeypox July 28 as the virus continues to spread in the U.S., NBC News reported. 

The news comes after the World Health Organization declared monkeypox a global emergency July 23 and as the CDC reported 4,907 confirmed cases nationwide as of July 28. California and New York account for more than 40 percent of the reported cases in the U.S., according to The Washington Post.

In a statement, New York State Commissioner of Health Mary Bassett, MD, said the declaration allows local health departments "to access additional state reimbursement, after other federal and state funding sources are maximized, to protect all New Yorkers and ultimately limit the spread of monkeypox in our communities." It covers monkeypox prevention response and activities from June 1 through the end of the year. 

In San Francisco, the monkeypox public health emergency takes effect Aug. 1, city officials said in a news release. The release, from Mayor London Breed and the San Francisco Department of Public Health, said the declaration "will mobilize city resources, accelerate emergency planning, streamline staffing, coordinate agencies across the city, allow for future reimbursement by the state and federal governments and raise awareness throughout San Francisco about [monkeypox]."

Four other updates: 

1. HHS announced July 28 that nearly 800,000 additional monkeypox vaccine doses will be available for distribution to states and jurisdictions. The 786,000 additional doses are on top of the more than 300,000 doses already distributed. This means the U.S. has secured a total of about 1.1 million doses "that will be in the hands of those who need them in the next several weeks," HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra said during a July 28 news conference. The additional doses will be allocated based on the total population of at-risk people and the number of new cases in each jurisdiction. "This strategy ensures that jurisdictions have the doses needed to complete the second dose of this two-dose vaccine regimen for those who have been vaccinated over the past month," HHS said in a news release. 

2. As of the morning of July 29, the U.S. has held off on declaring a national monkeypox emergency. Mr. Becerra said July 28 that HHS "continue[s] to monitor the response throughout the country on monkeypox" and will weigh any decision regarding a public health emergency declaration based on the response.

3. The monkeypox response is straining public health workers. Health experts are concerned over how the monkeypox response will further deplete the nation's public health workforce, still strained and burnt out from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Barriers to testing, treatment and vaccine access largely mirror the missteps in the early coronavirus response, Megan Ranney, MD, emergency physician and academic dean of  Brown University School of Public Health in Providence, R.I, told The Washington Post. "I can't help but wonder if part of the delay is that our public health workforce is so burned out," she said. "Everyone who's available to work on epidemiology or contract tracing is already doing it for COVID-19." 

4. Monkeypox testing demand is low, commercial laboratories told CNN. In recent weeks, five major commercial laboratories have begun monkeypox testing, giving the nation capacity to conduct 80,000 tests per week. While Mayo Clinic Laboratories can process 1,000 samples a week, it's received just 45 specimens from physicians since it began monkeypox testing July 11, according to the July 28 CNN report. "Without testing, you're flying blind," William Morice, MD, PhD, president of Mayo's lab and chair of the board of directors at the American Clinical Laboratory Association, told the news outlet. "The biggest concern is that you're not going to identify cases and [monkeypox] could become an endemic illness in this country. That's something we really have to worry about."



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