ONC Report Finds Meaningful Use Improves Healthcare Quality, Safety

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RAND has released a comprehensive literature review prepared for the ONC on the impact of meaningful use functionalities on healthcare quality, safety and efficiency.

The literature review found that the majority of new studies indicate meaningful use functionalities enabled significant gains in healthcare quality. In ambulatory care settings, 83 percent of the studies reported positive or mixed-positive results. In non-ambulatory care settings, 93 percent of the studies reported positive or mixed-positive results.

The review also found the majority of new studies indicate meaningful use had a positive impact on healthcare safety. In ambulatory care settings, 69 percent of the studies reported positive or mixed-positive results. In non-ambulatory care settings, 73 percent of the studies reported positive or mixed-positive results.

"Our findings agree with previous health IT literature reviews suggesting that health IT, particularly those functionalities included in the meaningful use regulation, can improve healthcare quality and safety," states the report.

Healthcare efficiency was also included in the review, but due to little research on that area, the review was unable to produce a finding.

The review was based on the findings of 236 new studies meeting the eligibility criteria of assessing effect of health IT on quality, safety and efficiency in ambulatory and non-ambulatory care settings.

More Articles on Meaningful Use:

CMS: No MU2 Delay, But Flexibility in Hardship Exemptions 
How the ONC is Working Toward Interoperability 
Intermountain to Skip MU Attestation in 2014

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