Study: Physicians dissatisfied with EHRs more often want to leave jobs

Self-reported burnout, dissatisfaction with work-life balance and dissatisfaction with EHRs are independent predictors of a physician's desire to leave their current job, according to a study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The researchers — led by Christine A. Sinsky, MD, vice president of professional satisfaction at the American Medical Association — surveyed 6,880 U.S. physicians across all specialties between Aug. 28, 2014, and Oct. 6, 2014, about their likelihood of reducing clinical hours or leaving medicine.

Of the 6,695 physicians who were in clinical practice at the time of the survey, 19.8 percent reported it was likely or definite they would reduce their clinical hours in the next year. A total of 1.9 percent of physicians reported it was likely or definite they would leave medicine in the next two years.

The researchers determined burnout, dissatisfaction with work-life balance and dissatisfaction with EHRs were independent predictors of physicians' intent to reduce clinical hours or leave their current practice.

"If physicians follow through on these intentions, it could profoundly worsen the projected shortage of U.S. physicians," the study authors concluded.

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