March 2019 Issue of Becker's Healthcare Review

March 2019 Issue of Becker's Healthcare Review

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ON THE COVER

41 physicians to split with Novant Health in May
Winston-Salem, N.C.-based Novant Health revealed Jan. 28 that the 41 physicians who plan to leave the system will do so on May 31 at 5 p.m., The Charlotte Observer reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Physician burnout is a 'public health crisis': 3 strategies to address it
Physician burnout is a public health issue that "urgently demands action" from the rest of the healthcare industry, according to a report from Harvard University and Massachusetts trade groups. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Steal this idea: How Chick-fil-A inspired Baystate executives to redesign nurse hiring
Two Massachusetts hospital executives were able to boost staff satisfaction and reduce time-to-fill for certain nursing positions to as little as two hours, thanks to a bit of inspiration from Chick-fil-A. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

How IU Health is attracting millennials, retaining new nurses
Healthcare organizations are increasingly focused on recruiting millennials and retaining new nurses as baby boomers retire. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

UnitedHealth's Optum revenues surpass $100B for 1st time
Growth in UnitedHealth Group's health services business Optum helped the health insurance company beat Wall Street estimates for the fourth quarter ended Dec. 31, according to Reuters. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Apple, Aetna team up on health app: 8 things to know
Apple and Aetna are joining forces to build an iPhone and Apple Watch app that will reward Aetna members for meeting health goals such as regularly exercising or getting enough sleep each night, CNBC reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Rural California hospital 'defying gravity' as it changes strategy to survive
Cash-strapped Sonoma Valley Hospital faces the same issues as many rural hospitals, including a disproportionate share of Medicaid and Medicare funding and a lower number of privately insured patients. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Hospital-owned drug company to offer 20 generics in 2019
Civica Rx, the nonprofit generic drug company formed by a group of hospital systems, expects to provide about 20 products this year to alleviate shortages, according to Reuters. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHI to sell health plan to Centene
Englewood, Colo.-based Catholic Health Initiatives agreed to sell its health plan to Centene Corp., according to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Partners CEO Dr. David Torchiana abruptly steps down
Boston-based Partners HealthCare President and CEO David Torchiana, MD, reportedly stepped down from his leadership roles Jan. 28, two sources familiar with the matter told The Boston Globe. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHS' Lutheran Health Network CEO to give up title in strategic move
Fort Wayne, Ind.-based Lutheran Health Network Vice President and CEO Mike Poore revealed he is planning to give up his title as chief executive, The Journal Gazette reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Aetna, IBM among 5 companies to launch healthcare's newest blockchain ecosystem
Aetna, Anthem, Health Care Service Corp., PNC Bank and IBM unveiled a new collaborative blockchain project Jan. 24 designed to improve transparency and interoperability in healthcare. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Mount Sinai just opened a 'man cave' — here's why
New York City-based Mount Sinai Health System recently unveiled a "man cave"-themed waiting room at the urology department's practice in midtown Manhattan to encourage male patients to get screened for prostate cancer. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Why do flu shots fail? Human immune system may be to blame
When patients catch the flu even after getting a flu shot, many physicians identify strain differences as the culprit. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Mount Sinai CEO Dr. Kenneth Davis: 5 ways to lower drug prices
High drug prices are one of the most pressing issues facing patients today, and the U.S. government must take action to help relieve the significant burden these prices present. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHI Health CFO Jeanette Wojtalewicz: 'CFOs really need to be a COO with a financial twist'
With 35 years of healthcare experience, Jeanette Wojtalewicz knows the CFO role and how it has evolved in recent decades. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Steal this idea: How Chick-fil-A inspired Baystate executives to redesign nurse hiring
Two Massachusetts hospital executives were able to boost staff satisfaction and reduce time-to-fill for certain nursing positions to as little as two hours, thanks to a bit of inspiration from Chick-fil-A. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Michael Dowling: Let's remember who we are as Americans
At a time when we are confronted with near-daily reports about the dangers posed by immigrants, it is important to remind ourselves of who we are as Americans — immigrants and the descendants of immigrants. It is important for us to reflect on our history and to think of those who came before us, making it possible for each of us to benefit from their courage and hardship. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Corner Office: Nationwide Children's CMIO Dr. Jeffrey Hoffman on the power of continuous learning
Jeffrey Hoffman, MD, began working at Columbus, Ohio-based Nationwide Children's Hospital 15 years ago as a pediatric emergency medicine physician. Committed to a lifetime of learning, Dr. Hoffman shifted his practice to informatics. In 2013, he became one of the first physicians in the county to earn board certification in clinical informatics. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

 

CFO / FINANCE

BCBS of Mississippi to change policy for care it deems nonemergent
Following the footsteps of other Blue plans, Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi will change how it pays for emergency room services it decides weren't emergent after care is delivered, according to the Daily Journal. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Rural California hospital 'defying gravity' as it changes strategy to survive
Cash-strapped Sonoma Valley Hospital faces the same issues as many rural hospitals, including a disproportionate share of Medicaid and Medicare funding and a lower number of privately insured patients. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Hospital chain delinquent on taxes in 7 states
Kansas City, Mo.-based EmpowerHMS owes roughly $1.8 million in real estate and property taxes for hospitals it operates across seven states, according to the Arkansas Democrat Gazette. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

UnitedHealth's Optum revenues surpass $100B for 1st time
Growth in UnitedHealth Group's health services business Optum helped the health insurance company beat Wall Street estimates for the fourth quarter ended Dec. 31, according to Reuters. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Zuckerberg hospital slashes $20,243 ER bill to $200 after media coverage
Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital will lower a patient's $20,243 emergency room bill after a Vox report revealed the hospital is out of network with all private health plans. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

HCA more than doubles profit in Q4
Nashville, Tenn.-based HCA Healthcare's revenue and profit increased year over year in the fourth quarter of 2018. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Hospital-owned drug company to offer 20 generics in 2019
Civica Rx, the nonprofit generic drug company formed by a group of hospital systems, expects to provide about 20 products this year to alleviate shortages, according to Reuters. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Tennessee hospital to close, lay off 146
Cumberland River Hospital in Celina, Tenn., will close March 1. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Maine hospital files for bankruptcy
Penobscot Valley Hospital, a 25-bed critical access hospital in Lincoln, Maine, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Jan. 29. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Most consumers would prepay for prescriptions for a discount, survey finds
Sixty-four percent of consumers reported that they would jump on an opportunity to prepay for medications to receive a discounted price, according to a survey from DrFirst, a provider of e-prescribing and patient medication management solutions. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Saint Alphonsus Health CEO on price transparency: 'We do not view patients as consumers or shoppers'
Odette Bolano, president and CEO of Boise, Idaho-based Saint Alphonsus Health System, addressed CMS' new price transparency rule in an op-ed in the Idaho Statesman. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Vermont hospital backtracks on questionable bills
Roughly 1,900 patients received bills from University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington last month for procedures dating back to 2017, according to WCAX. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Sanford Health grows to $5B+ system after finalizing merger
Sanford Health completed its merger with the nationwide senior care services provider Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society, the health system announced Jan. 2. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Tenet sells 3 hospitals, exits Chicago market
Dallas-based Tenet Healthcare completed the sale of its three remaining Chicago-area hospitals. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Top 10 cities for healthcare M&A
The top U.S. city for healthcare mergers and acquisitions is Boston, according to an analysis by Mergermarket. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHI to sell health plan to Centene
Englewood, Colo.-based Catholic Health Initiatives agreed to sell its health plan to Centene Corp., according to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Kettering Health Network to sell $200M in bonds to fund expansion
Dayton, Ohio-based Kettering Health Network plans to sell $200 million in bonds to help finance upcoming expansion projects, according to The Bond Buyer. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Size of organizations in mergers continues to grow, study finds
As healthcare merger and acquisition activity continued to increase in 2018, the average size of organizations participating in mergers also grew, according to Kaufman Hall's "2018 M&A in Review: A New Healthcare Landscape Takes Shape." CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CEO / STRATEGY

41 physicians to split with Novant Health in May
Winston-Salem, N.C.-based Novant Health revealed Jan. 28 that the 41 physicians who plan to leave the system will do so on May 31 at 5 p.m., The Charlotte Observer reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHS' Lutheran Health Network CEO to give up title in strategic move
Fort Wayne, Ind.-based Lutheran Health Network Vice President and CEO Mike Poore revealed he is planning to give up his title as chief executive, The Journal Gazette reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Employers are the most trusted institutions in 2019
People are looking to CEOs to lead change, rather than waiting for the government to require it, according to the 2019 Edelman Trust Barometer, an annual gauge of global opinion. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Optum sues to protect trade secrets from Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan venture
Optum, the rapidly growing health services unit of UnitedHealth Group, filed a lawsuit seeking to protect its trade secrets from a healthcare venture launched by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase, according to STAT. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Almost 80% of CEOs say burnout affects workplace, report finds
The majority of survey respondents (79 percent) said burnout is negatively affecting their workplace, according to a recent report from executive search firm Witt/Kieffer. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

8 groups, 1 voice: Kaiser Permanente rebrands physician group
Permanente Medical Groups, the multispecialty physician groups affiliated with Oakland, Calif.-based Kaiser Permanente, unveiled a new website Jan. 15 that aims to unify the organization's eight medical groups into one cohesive brand. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

PwC: CEOs predict less growth in 2019
Compared to last year, CEOs are more pessimistic about global economic growth in 2019 and are turning inward to focus on immediate business threats and skills gaps, according to PwC's 22nd Annual Global CEO Survey. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Temple University Health loses top execs amid restructuring
Philadelphia-based Temple University Health System President and CEO Larry Kaiser, MD, confirmed in a letter to colleagues that two top executives plan to depart and their roles will be eliminated, The Inquirer reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Less than 50% of Americans satisfied with nation's quality of care, poll finds
While most Americans are satisfied with the United States' military strength and preparedness (78 percent) and security from terrorism (68 percent), less than half are content with the quality of medical care in the U.S., according to a Gallup poll published Jan. 28. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

 CIO / HEALTH IT

Apple, Aetna team up on health app: 8 things to know
Apple and Aetna are joining forces to build an iPhone and Apple Watch app that will reward Aetna members for meeting health goals such as regularly exercising or getting enough sleep each night, CNBC reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

IBM CEO Ginni Rometty: AI will change '100% of jobs'
IBM CEO Ginni Rometty highlighted how artificial intelligence will reshape business and society during her opening keynote for the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas Jan. 8. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

New malware can bypass cloud security barriers, researchers warn
A new malware strain may be able to uninstall security products deployed in the cloud, according to a report from researchers at cybersecurity firm Palo Alto Networks and reported by The Hill. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

How Intermountain Healthcare is investing in health IT: 3 Qs with CIO Marc Probst
Marc Probst, CIO and vice president at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, discusses how the health system has saved through its cost reduction efforts and what health IT areas it plans to invest in this year. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Mentions of 'Amazon' spiked at healthcare companies in 2017, analysis finds
Businesses across multiple industries can no longer afford to ignore Amazon — and they aren't, according to a Quartz analysis. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

A ransomware attack could cost US economy $89B, researchers warn
A global ransomware attack could cost the U.S. economy up to $89 billion, according to a new report from the Cyber Risk Management project. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Jim Cramer: If Epic doesn't want to sell, maybe Apple should look at Cerner
CNBC's Jim Cramer has revisited his suggestion that Apple should buy Verona, Wis.-based health records company Epic amid a flood of feedback. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Why Microsoft's head of healthcare once thought his role was a 'career-ending move'
Peter Lee, corporate vice president of Microsoft Healthcare, said he thought he had made a "career-ending move" after Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella asked him to head up the company's healthcare strategy almost three years ago, according to SFGate. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

5 health IT projects Sharp HealthCare CIO Ken Lawonn is excited for in 2019
Ken Lawonn, senior vice president and CIO at Sharp HealthCare in San Diego, shares the projects he's most excited for in 2019, including the health system's new colocation data center and additions to its enterprise analytics area. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Aetna, IBM among 5 companies to launch healthcare's newest blockchain ecosystem
Aetna, IBM among 5 companies to launch healthcare's newest blockchain ecosystem. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Texas Hospital Association helps local hospitals adapt EHRs to address opioid crisis
The Texas Hospital Association is helping hospitals throughout the state add an additional layer of clinical decision support to their EHRs, the Houston Chronicle reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

In rural Wisconsin, physicians say telemedicine isn't growing fast enough
Many physicians say Wisconsin's underserved populations could benefit from telemedicine, particularly as state residents' need for healthcare is expected to increase 20 percent by 2023, Wisconsin Public Radio reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Man gets 10 years for hacking network of Boston Children's Hospital
A Massachusetts man will serve more than 10 years in prison for his role in a 2014 cyberattack on the computer networks of Boston Children's Hospital and a mental health facility, Reuters reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

New strain of ransomware claims to donate profits to fictitious children's cancer charity
Cyberattackers have reportedly been using a strain of ransomware called CryptoMix to remotely hack computers and then falsely claiming that victims' ransom payments will be used to fund children's medical help, HealthcareInfoSecurity reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Patient dies hours after being turned away from Wisconsin hospital
A patient at a Franklin, Wis., hospital died of heart disease hours after being sent home to wait for a bed to be freed up for him, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Johns Hopkins hospitals don't always follow 'basic safety rules,' report claims
Baltimore-based Johns Hopkins Medicine has faced numerous allegations of "making preventable errors or setting aside basic safety rules" in recent years, which arguably contradicts its reputation as a national leader in patient safety, according to an investigative report from the Tampa Bay Times. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Mount Sinai just opened a 'man cave' — here's why
New York City-based Mount Sinai Health System recently unveiled a "man cave"-themed waiting room at the urology department's practice in midtown Manhattan to encourage male patients to get screened for prostate cancer. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CMO / CARE DELIVERY

Mount Carmel CEO: We should have acted faster with physician accused of fatal prescriptions
Columbus, Ohio-based Mount Carmel Health System executives are apologizing for the system's delayed response after an investigation into a former physician's prescribing practices identified seven additional near-death hospital patients who received excessive doses of painkillers, bringing the number of affected patients to 34, The Columbus Dispatch reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

2 DMC hospitals at risk of losing Medicare contracts over infection control issues
CMS warned DMC Harper University Hospital and DMC Detroit Receiving Hospital that they will be terminated from the Medicare program April 15 unless they correct infection control issues, according to enforcement letters obtained by Becker's. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

50% of female physicians say they're burned out, report finds
Forty-four percent of physicians said they experience burnout, according to a recent report by Medscape. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Physician burnout is a 'public health crisis': 3 strategies to address it
Physician burnout is a public health issue that "urgently demands action" from the rest of the healthcare industry, according to a report from Harvard University and Massachusetts trade groups. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

How this Cleveland Clinic program is curbing physician burnout
A physician peer coaching program might be one way for hospitals and health systems to fight burnout, according to the American Medical Association. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

This Florida hospital installed ballet bars in its hallways — here's why
Orlando, Fla.-based Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies installed ballet bars in its hallways for pregnant women to use during labor, reports News 6 WKMG. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Physician's encouraging words more effective than many may realize, study finds
When physicians are warm and reassuring, patients' health outcomes may improve significantly, two social psychologists write in The New York Times. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Why do flu shots fail? Human immune system may be to blame
When patients catch the flu even after getting a flu shot, many physicians identify strain differences as the culprit. However, flu science is increasingly identifying another cause for failed flu protection: patients' own immune systems, according to STAT. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Boston Children's researchers tap machine learning for better flu surveillance
Researchers created a surveillance model that uses machine learning to provide highly accurate estimates of local flu activity, according to a study published in Nature Communications. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

How IU Health is attracting millennials, retaining new nurses
Healthcare organizations are increasingly focused on recruiting millennials and retaining new nurses as baby boomers retire. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Mount Sinai CEO Dr. Kenneth Davis: 5 ways to lower drug prices
High drug prices are one of the most pressing issues facing patients today, and the U.S. government must take action to help relieve the significant burden these prices present. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHI Health CFO Jeanette Wojtalewicz: 'CFOs really need to be a COO with a financial twist'
With 35 years of healthcare experience, Jeanette Wojtalewicz knows the CFO role and how it has evolved in recent decades. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Steal this idea: How Chick-fil-A inspired Baystate executives to redesign nurse hiring
Two Massachusetts hospital executives were able to boost staff satisfaction and reduce time-to-fill for certain nursing positions to as little as two hours, thanks to a bit of inspiration from Chick-fil-A. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Michael Dowling: Let's remember who we are as Americans
At a time when we are confronted with near-daily reports about the dangers posed by immigrants, it is important to remind ourselves of who we are as Americans — immigrants and the descendants of immigrants. It is important for us to reflect on our history and to think of those who came before us, making it possible for each of us to benefit from their courage and hardship. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Corner Office: Nationwide Children's CMIO Dr. Jeffrey Hoffman on the power of continuous learning
Jeffrey Hoffman, MD, began working at Columbus, Ohio-based Nationwide Children's Hospital 15 years ago as a pediatric emergency medicine physician. Committed to a lifetime of learning, Dr. Hoffman shifted his practice to informatics. In 2013, he became one of the first physicians in the county to earn board certification in clinical informatics. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE 

 

CEO / STRATEGY

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