44% of US physicians think telehealth programs are 'poor' or 'very poor'

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Only 15 percent of U.S. physicians believe their state has done a good job adopting telehealth strategies, according to a SERMO survey.

SERMO, a global social network for physicians, asked its member physicians to gauge how well their country has implemented telehealth strategies. For the 1,651 physicians in the United States, SERMO also asked how well their state has adopted telehealth strategies.

Here are five findings.

1. The plurality of U.S. physicians (44 percent) said their state's telehealth programs are "poor" or "very poor."

2. The states in which the highest percent of physicians said their state had implemented telehealth "well" or "very well" were Ohio (22 percent) and California (20 percent).

3. The states in which the highest percent of physicians said their state had implemented telehealth "poorly" or "very poorly" were New Jersey (59 percent) and New York (51 percent).

4. Internationally, the country in which the highest percent of physicians rated the implementation of telehealth positively was Spain (26 percent said "well" or "very well").

5. The worst-rated country was the United Kingdom, where 62 percent of physicians said telehealth implementation in the country was "poor" or "very poor."

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