Almost 80% of med students are burned out, study finds

Nearly 80 percent of medical school students indicated they have experienced burnout at least some of the time during their education, a recent report by Medscape found.

Medscape surveyed 2,365 current medical students between May 16 and June 14 for its annual "Medical Student Life & Education Report 2018," asking students numerous questions about their reasons for entering the medical field, how much debt they expect to accumulate and whether they've experienced incidents of discrimination or harassment.

Here are five takeaways from the report:

1. Roughly 84 percent of male students and 83 percent of female students said they opted to pursue a career in medicine because of their desire to help those in need.

2. Of those who said they knew which specialty they wanted to enter, 69 percent of students said they selected that field because they had a personal interest in it.

3. Seventy percent of students said they have never experienced unwanted advances during medical school, while 64 percent said they've never witnessed such events.

4. Almost half of students (46 percent) said they "sometimes" doubt their ability to be a quality practicing physician.

5. While 77 percent of students said they have experienced burnout, 53 percent of those surveyed said they've "never" considered leaving medical school.

To access the full report, click here.

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