7 EHR design, use factors clinicians attribute to burnout

Nearly one in five clinicians associate EHR design and use with  workplace stress and burnout, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open.

For the report, researchers from eight health systems, including Westminster, Colo.-based Centura Health and Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., surveyed 282 clinicians on stress and burnout associated with various EHR design and use factors. The survey participants were ambulatory primary care and subspecialty clinicians from three healthcare organizations.

Here are the seven EHR design and use factors that participants attributed to their feelings of stress and burnout:

· Excessive data entry requirements: 86.9 percent.
· Long cut-and-pasted notes: 75.2 percent.
· Lack of access to data from other institutions: 73.1 percent.
· Billing-related notes: 73.1 percent.
· Work-life balance disruption: 63.1 percent.
· Posture issues from EHR use: 51.1 percent.
· Pain issues from EHR use: 47.5 percent.

Overall, EHR design and use factors accounted for 12.5 percent of variance in participants' reported measures of stress and 6.8 percent of variance in measures of burnout. Work conditions, such as chaotic atmosphere and workload control, corresponded with  higher levels of stress (58.1 percent) and burnout (36.2 percent)

To access the full report, click here.

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