Iowa medical school first to require coursework on mental healthcare

Des Moines (Iowa) University is the first medical school in the nation to require courses on mental healthcare, according to local NBC affiliate WHO TV.

The osteopathic medical school began offering an elective course on mental health in 2018 through a partnership with the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and in two years, that course has become a requirement, according to the report.

Called the "Provider Education Program," coursework includes hearing from a person recovering from mental illness, a family member or friend with mental illness, and a healthcare provider. A key facet of the course is to reduce the stigma around mental illness for medical students.

The class currently has 200 enrolled students, and DMU is seeking additional funding to make the class a permanent part of curriculum.

Read the full story here.

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