Mount Sinai to create series about digital health innovations for Science Channel

New York City-based Mount Sinai Health System announced a new partnership with Discovery's Science Channel to create a series of six digital news segments showcasing groundbreaking medical innovations.

Each segment will focus on a different Mount Sinai research initiative for the treatment of various life-threatening conditions and diseases. The series will begin airing on Science Channel and its social media platforms later this month.

The segments will cover:

  • A "digital spinal cord" comprising a microscopic device implanted on the brain to transmit signals and control an exoskeleton or artificial limbs.
  • Efforts to implement a new imaging agent and method for the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients with a history of concussions.
  • High-tech pop-up Lab100, where data scientists and engineers are combining artificial intelligence, robotics, genomic sequencing, wearable devices and more to individualize the patient experience during medical appointments.
  • The development of new technology-based solutions for individuals with brain and spinal cord injuries who need improved access to healthcare.
  • Studies of molecular and neurochemical reactions in the brain to understand whether cannabinoids can provide long-lasting therapeutic effects for individuals with opioid addiction.
  • The first "digital therapeutic" depression treatment, an app that asks users to identify pictures of faces displaying certain emotions and has been proven in a clinical study to significantly reduce users' major depressive disorder symptoms.

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