Race-based disparities in MRSA incidence persists

A study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases examined the racial disparities in incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

Researchers studied surveillance data from CDC's Emerging Infections Program between 2005 and 2014. They identified cases of hospital-onset, healthcare-associated community onset and community-associated MRSA.

The study shows during the study period invasive hospital-onset, healthcare-associated community onset MRSA rates decreased. However, African-Americans experienced higher rates of hospital-onset, healthcare-associated community onset and community-associated MRSA. The racial differences did not change over time.

"Improved understanding of the underlying causes of these differences is needed to develop effective prevention interventions that reduce racial disparities in MRSA infections," study authors concluded.

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