Patient deaths after colorectal surgery declined from 2008 to 2017

The rate of adults who died within 30 days of colorectal surgery dropped from 4.3 percent in 2008 to 2.9 percent in 2017, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Patient Safety Chartbook.

The chartbook's reports are based on more than 250 measures of quality and disparities covering a variety of healthcare services and settings.

From 2008 to 2017, the report found 30-day postoperative mortality after colorectal surgery decreased overall and for white patients and black patients.

However, in 2017, 30-day postoperative mortality after colorectal surgery was worse for black patients (3.5 percent) compared to  white patients (2.8 percent). For Hispanic patients, 30-day postoperative mortality was lower than for white patients (2.2 percent).

The report also found mortality in nonteaching hospitals (2.9 percent) was similar to that seen in teaching hospitals (2.8 percent).

Colorectal procedures have high rates of postoperative complications, and nonadherence to evidence-based best practices is linked to a higher risk of these complications, the researchers said.

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