And then there was one: 11 CEOs who moved up or out after mergers

As hospitals consolidate, so must the C-suite. After mergers and acquisitions, many top executives leave by choice, some retire and others are appointed to different roles within the expanded organization.

The following 11 executives resigned, retired or moved to a new position following a merger with another hospital or health system in the past year. Some of the below deals are still pending regulatory approval, but leadership positions have been determined.

1. Randee Reynolds, former president and CEO of Parkview Adventist Medical Center (Brunswick, Maine)
Parkview declared chapter 11 bankruptcy in June and officially merged in August with Mid Coast Health Services, also based in Brunswick. Parkview's former top executive, Randee Reynolds, was appointed to stay on as vice president of community health and integration for the merged healthcare system, now called Mid Coast-Parkview Health.

2. Thomas Beeman, PhD, former president and CEO of Lancaster (Pa.) General Health
After a more than a decade at the helm of LG Health, Dr. Beeman was appointed COO of regional operations for University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia. He changed roles about a week after LG Health became a member of UPHS.

3. Judith Maness, former president and CEO of Mount St. Mary's Hospital (Lewiston, N.Y.)
Ms. Maness retired June 30 following the completion of Mount St. Mary's merger with
Catholic Health, a joint venture between St. Louis-based Ascension Health, Livonia, Mich.-based Trinity Health and the Diocese of Buffalo. She stayed on to help create and implement a formal transition plan.

4. Gary Kaatz, former president and CEO of Rockford (Ill.) Health System
Mr. Kaatz retired June 26 following Rockford Health System's merger with Janesville, Wis.-based Mercy Health System. The two entities began operating as a combined health system January 1. Javon Bea is president and CEO of Mercy.

5. John Lloyd, president and CEO of Meridian Health (Neptune, N.J.)
Hackensack (N.J.) University Health Network and Meridian Health signed a definitive agreement to merge in May and become Hackensack Meridian Health. Pending regulatory approval, Hackensack Meridian Health will be led by co-CEOs John Lloyd, current president and CEO of Meridian Health, and Robert Garrett, current president and CEO of Hackensack University Health Network. After two and half years, Mr. Garrett will assume the role as sole CEO of the organization.

6. Stephen Jones, president and CEO of Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and Robert Wood Johnson Health System (New Brunswick, N.J.)
Orange, N.J.-based Barnabas Health and Robert Wood Johnson Health System agreed in July to a merger that would create New Jersey's largest healthcare system: RWJ Barnabas Health. Barry Ostrowsky, president and CEO of Barnabas Health, will serve as inaugural president and CEO of the merged 11-hospital system. Stephen Jones, president and CEO of Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and Robert Wood Johnson Health System, will serve as chief academic officer to further strengthen the relationship between the new entity and its academic partner, Rutgers University. The deal is slated for completion next year.

7. David Crane, president and CEO of Adventist Midwest Health (Hinsdale, Ill.)
Alexian Brothers Health System and Adventist Midwest Health created a joint operating company this April called Amita Health. Alexian CEO Mark Frey was named CEO of Amita, while Adventist CEO David Crane became COO and executive vice president of the JOC, according to Crain's Chicago Business.

8. Alan Levine, president and CEO of Mountain States Health Alliance (Johnson City, Tenn.)
In early April 2015, Kingsport Tenn.-based Wellmont Health System and Mountain States announced plans to merge. Bert Hove, president and CEO of Wellmont, will take the helm as CEO of the merged organization, and report to Alan Levine, who will be promoted to executive chairman and president of the combined system. The deal is still pending regulatory approval. The leaders will continue to serve in their current roles and the systems will remain independent until the merger has been approved.

9. Laurence Merlis, former president and CEO of Abington (Pa.) Health
Mr. Merlis was named senior executive vice president and COO of the merged system between Abington Health and Philadelphia-based Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health System. Stephen Klasko, MD, the president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Thomas Jefferson Health System, was appointed president and CEO of the combined organizations.

10. David McQuaid, RPh, former president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals (Philadelphia)
According to Stephen Klasko, MD, president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health System, Dr. McQuaid decided to resign after eight years as president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals due to "a change in management control due to our recent merger with Abington Health." Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health System completed its merger with Abington (Pa.) Health this spring. At the time of his departure in February, Mr. McQuaid did not state his next professional plans.  

11. Michael Young, president and CEO of PinnacleHealth System (Harrisburg, Pa.)
Penn State Milton S. Hershey (Pa.) Medical Center agreed to merge with PinnacleHealth System to form a new health enterprise, Penn State Health. According to The Patriot-News, PinnacleHealth's President and CEO Michael Young will be appointed president and COO of the new enterprise and Penn State Hershey CEO A. Craig Hillemeier, MD, will be CEO. The deal is pending approval from the Federal Trade Commission and the state attorney general.

 Correction: This article was updated at 10:34 a.m. CT on Oct. 1 to reflect a correction to Alan Levine's position. The article incorrectly stated his role was unspecified. Mr. Levine will serve as executive chairman and president of the organization formed from the merger of Mountain States Alliance and Wellmont Health System. We regret this error. 

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