Fitbit launches new, cheaper wearables to attract more customers: 4 notes

Fitbit unveiled three new activity trackers and a new edition of its smartwatch at a lower price point.

Four notes on the new products and developments:

1. Fitbit Versa Lite Edition: Building on the company's Fitbit Versa smartwatch, the Versa Lite includes most of the Versa's features, including automatic activity, 24/7 heart rate monitoring and sleep stage tracking. The new edition doesn't include on-screen workouts, floors climbed or the ability to play music, separating it from the original Versa.

The new smartwatch costs $159.95, which is priced $40 cheaper than the Versa.

2. Fitbit Inspire HR and Fitbit Inspire: The activity trackers are designed for consumers wanting a low-priced wearable option. Both Fitbit Inspire HR and Fitbit Inspire automatically track all-day activity, exercise and sleep, but Inspire HR also includes 24/7 heart rate monitoring. Both options feature a new swim proof design and a touchscreen display.

The Fitbit Inspire HR is priced at $99.95, while Fitbit Inspire costs $69.95.

3. Fitbit Ace 2: Designed for users over age 6, Fitbit's Ace 2 features activity and sleep tracking, swim proof abilities and step challenges for children. Additionally, parents can set up a family account on the Fitbit app to monitor their child's activity.

The Fitbit Ace 2 will be available this summer and will cost $69.95.

4. Additionally, Fitbit is working on updates to its app to "give people more ways to tailor it, with easier access to tools and a global community that can help motivate them to reach their goals," Fitbit Vice President of Design Jonah Becker said in a news release emailed to Becker's Hospital Review. "This flexible mobile platform will allow us to offer more personalized services in the future, including coaching, guidance and insights based on personal data."

Fitbit has previously struggled to compete with Apple's smartwatch, with the company's shares dropping 12 percent in February. Additionally, Fitbit may soon face more competitors in the wearables market as companies such as Samsung and AT&T launch wearables of their own.

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