8 EHR snooping cases at hospitals in the last year

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Below are seven hospitals and health systems that have experienced nine cases of employees snooping patients' medical records in the last year.

  1. Douglas Burka, MD, worked at Nashville, Tenn.-based Vanderbilt University Medical Center from 2010-12. He was sued by his ex-wife in 2015 and 2016 for allegedly inappropriately accessing her medical records during their divorce. Dr. Bruka sued Vanderbilt because he claimed the system was obligated to defend him against his ex-wife's claims. In September 2021, it was reported that Vanderbilt won the lawsuit from Dr. Burka.

  2. Petersburg (Alaska) Medical Center began notifying patients in March that a hospital employee had wrongfully viewed their medical records. After launching an internal investigation, the hospital determined that the employee viewed records of patients who were not directly under their care.

  3. Boynton, Fla.-based Bethesda Hospital, part of Coral Gables, Fla.-based Baptist Health, said in January that it fired an employee for accessing patients' medical records and altering a home care patient's health order.

  4. New York City-based Montefiore Medical Center began notifying patients April 13 that their protected health information was inappropriately accessed by a former employee. The employee inappropriately viewed patient records between January 2020 and February 2021.

  5. New York City-based Long Island Jewish Forest Hills Hospital, part of New Hyde Park, N.Y.-based Northwell Health, began notifying more than 10,000 patients Aug. 6 that their EHRs were inappropriately accessed by a former employee. The hospital discovered the incident after reviewing a Jan. 24, 2020, subpoena seeking documents connected to a motor vehicle accident insurance scheme.

  6. Canton, Ohio-based Aultman Health Foundation began notifying around 7,300 patients in July that their EHRs had been inappropriately accessed by a former employee over the past decade. The former employee accessed patient information outside the scope of their job responsibilities between Sept. 14, 2009, and April 26, 2021. The employee has not been identified but has been fired and no longer has access to patient data.

  7. Gainesville-based University of Florida Health Shands began notifying 1,562 patients in May that a former employee wrongfully accessed their medical records during a two-year period. The hospital said it has terminated the employee's access to all medical records and other systems.

  8. Montefiore Medical Center began notifying patients April 13 that their EHRs were inappropriately accessed by a former employee. The employee inappropriately viewed patient records between January 2020 and February 2021.

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