January 2019 Becker's Hospital Review

January 2019 Issue of Becker's Hospital Review

 

 

ON THE COVER

Walmart will require workers to travel for spine surgery in effort to cut healthcare costs
Walmart is aiming to lower healthcare spending by requiring employees to travel to certain hospitals for spine surgeries, according to The Wall Street Journal. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Amazon to sell EHR-mining software
In a move that expands its budding presence in the healthcare space, Amazon is selling software that mines patient health records for information that helps physicians improve treatments and hospitals cut costs, The Wall Street Journal reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Physician viewpoint: How to remove 'stupid stuff' from EHRs
It's time to cut unnecessary work from the EHR, according to a perspective in The New England Journal of Medicine by Melinda Ashton, MD, a physician with Hawaii Pacific Health in Honolulu. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

'We have a moral imperative to speak out': 10 questions with the physician leading #ThisIsOurLane
Shot in the throat when he was 17, trauma surgeon Joseph Sakran, MD, has a message for the National Rifle Association: Of course healthcare providers have a role in the discussion around gun control, and they have a responsibility to speak up. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Geisinger CEO Dr. David Feinberg heads to Google: 5 things to know
David Feinberg, MD, CEO and president of Danville, Pa.-based Geisinger Health System, will take on a newly created healthcare role at Google, according to The Wall Street Journal. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHS to divest 4 hospitals, exit South Carolina
Franklin, Tenn.-based Community Health Systems plans to sell all of its hospitals in South Carolina. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Michigan hospital rejects woman's heart transplant, recommends she raise $10K
After rejecting a 60-year-old woman's request for a heart transplant for lack of "a more secure financial plan," Grand Rapids, Mich.-based Spectrum Health recommended that she start a $10,000 fundraiser to come up with the money, according to a Detroit Free Press report. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Physician group with 873 employees files for bankruptcy
Troy, Mich.-based University Physician Group, which does business as Wayne State University Physician Group, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Nov. 7. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

What CVS stores will look like after the Aetna deal
CVS Health closed its $70 billion acquisition of Aetna Nov. 28 and plans to repurpose many of its stores to dedicate more space to care delivery, according to USA Today. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Trump administration issues plan to promote healthcare competition: 7 notes
The Trump administration issued a 119-page manifesto Nov. 3 detailing more than 50 recommendations to promote choice and competition in the U.S. healthcare system. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Vanderbilt University Medical Center's finances bounce back after EMR launch
Nashville, Tenn.-based Vanderbilt University Medical Center reported higher revenue and operating income in the first quarter of its fiscal 2019 than in the same period of the year prior, according to recently released bondholder documents. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Detroit hospital cited after insects found in ICU
CMS cited Detroit-based DMC Harper University Hospital for several infection control issues, including bugs that were flying around an intensive care unit during a recent inspection, according to The Detroit News. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Firing of St. Louis nurse for violating mandatory flu shot policy sparks protest
A nurse was fired for violating St. Louis-based Mercy Hospital South's policy requiring a flu shot, sparking a protest outside the hospital, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Cost containment, the CFO evolution and more: Q&A with Mayo Clinic CFO Dennis Dahlen
A rapidly changing healthcare industry has left many CFOs struggling to balance their traditional responsibilities with a new set of strategic expectations, and few people understand this balance better than Dennis Dahlen. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

How Novant Health CEO Carl Armato's Type 1 diabetes changed the lives of more than 6,000 patients
Novant Health System President and CEO Carl Armato was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 18 months old. After living with the disease for more than 50 years, he credits diabetes for shaping him as a person and informing his strategy for preventive healthcare. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Michael Dowling: What not to do as a leader
Leading a hospital or health system is an undertaking that is nearly impossible to prepare for, so some of my past columns have offered advice to incoming executives on behaviors that I think are essential to success. Perhaps even more important than the list of things to do are actions that leaders must avoid if they hope to be effective. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Corner Office: Hackensack Meridian Health co-CEO Robert Garrett on the toughest task every executive faces
As co-CEO of Edison, N.J.-based Hackensack Meridian Health, Robert Garrett knows innovation is essential to success, but also understands that discerning which innovative proposals to support is as important as coming up with ideas in the first place. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CFO / FINANCE

Michigan hospital rejects woman's heart transplant, recommends she raise $10K
After rejecting a 60-year-old woman's request for a heart transplant for lack of "a more secure financial plan," Grand Rapids, Mich.-based Spectrum Health recommended that she start a $10,000 fundraiser to come up with the money, according to a Detroit Free Press report. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHS to divest 4 hospitals, exit South Carolina
Franklin, Tenn.-based Community Health Systems plans to sell all of its hospitals in South Carolina. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

California DOJ approves CHI-Dignity merger, with conditions
The California Department of Justice conditionally approved the proposed merger of Englewood, Colo.-based Catholic Health Initiatives and San Francisco-based Dignity Health on Nov. 21. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

HHS to launch new mandatory bundled payment models: 4 things to know
HHS canceled and scaled back major mandatory bundled payment models in 2017 under the leadership of then-Secretary Tom Price, MD. On Nov. 8, HHS Secretary Alex Azar said the agency is reversing course and plans to roll out mandatory bundled payment demonstrations. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Walmart will require workers to travel for spine surgery in effort to cut healthcare costs
Walmart is aiming to lower healthcare spending by requiring employees to travel to certain hospitals for spine surgeries, according to The Wall Street Journal. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CMS accepts Vanderbilt's plan to correct Medicare deficiencies
CMS published a notice Nov. 21 threatening to terminate Nashville, Tenn.-based Vanderbilt University Medical Center's Medicare provider agreement Dec. 9, stating the hospital was not in compliance with conditions of participation in the program. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

UnitedHealth Group to buy Seattle primary care clinic
UnitedHealth Group will acquire a controlling stake in Polyclinic, a large physician-owned primary and specialty care clinic in Seattle — the latest move in the company's push to expand its direct patient care business, according to The Seattle Times. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Financial troubles force Texas health system to shut down
Rockdale, Texas-based Little River Healthcare closed all of its facilities Dec. 4, including two hospitals and several medical clinics. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Physician group with 873 employees files for bankruptcy
Troy, Mich.-based University Physician Group, which does business as Wayne State University Physician Group, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Nov. 7. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CEO / STRATEGY

Forbes releases 30-under-30 in healthcare 2019
Forbes has released its annual 30-under-30 list for 2019. The 2019 class of healthcare-minded individuals features a number of physicians, biotech innovators and researchers all aiming to improve care delivery in the U.S. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

What CVS stores will look like after the Aetna deal
CVS Health closed its $70 billion acquisition of Aetna Nov. 28 and plans to repurpose many of its stores to dedicate more space to care delivery, according to USA Today. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Trump administration issues plan to promote healthcare competition: 7 notes
The Trump administration issued a 119-page manifesto Nov. 3 detailing more than 50 recommendations to promote choice and competition in the U.S. healthcare system. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Amazon-JPMorgan-Berkshire health venture snags first female exec
The joint health company formed by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase hired its first female executive, CNBC reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Massachusetts hospital publicly apologizes for 2016 patient death
The parent company of CHA Somerville (Mass.) Hospital issued a public apology Nov. 7 for failing to meet its own transparency and accountability standards in the 2016 death of a patient who died feet from Somerville Hospital's emergency room, according to The Boston Globe. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Geisinger CEO Dr. David Feinberg heads to Google: 5 things to know
David Feinberg, MD, CEO and president of Danville, Pa.-based Geisinger Health System, will take on a newly created healthcare role at Google, according to The Wall Street Journal. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CHS settles lawsuit against ex-CEO of Indiana hospital
Fort Wayne, Ind.-based Lutheran Health Network and its parent company Franklin, Tenn.-based Community Health Systems have settled their lawsuit against LHN's former CEO, according to The Journal Gazette. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CIO / HEALTH IT

Amazon to sell EHR-mining software
In a move that expands its budding presence in the healthcare space, Amazon is selling software that mines patient health records for information that helps physicians improve treatments and hospitals cut costs, The Wall Street Journal reports. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Vanderbilt University Medical Center's finances bounce back after EMR launch
Nashville, Tenn.-based Vanderbilt University Medical Center reported higher revenue and operating income in the first quarter of its fiscal 2019 than in the same period of the year prior, according to recently released bondholder documents. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

SLU physician group implements hiring freeze after EHR rollout
St. Louis University is implementing a cost-cutting initiative and a hiring freeze as it faces a projected $30 million deficit by 2023 due to lower student enrollment and less revenue from its medical practice, according to KBIA. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Hackers indicted in SamSam ransomware attacks on Allscripts, hospitals
A grand jury in New Jersey has indicted two Iranian hackers in connection with the ransomware campaign that crippled more than 200 organizations, including Allscripts and several hospitals, universities and cities, according to an ABC 7 report. The men are still at large. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Allscripts confirms layoffs
Chicago-based health IT company Allscripts has confirmed staff layoffs to Becker's Hospital Review. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Aetna, Ascension join blockchain pilot project to address provider data issues
Aetna and St. Louis-based Ascension, the nation's largest nonprofit health system, have joined a blockchain technology-driven effort to improve data quality and reduce administrative costs related to updating and maintaining provider demographic data. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Physician viewpoint: How to remove 'stupid stuff' from EHRs
It's time to cut unnecessary work from the EHR, according to a perspective in The New England Journal of Medicine by Melinda Ashton, MD, a physician with Hawaii Pacific Health in Honolulu. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Athenahealth files its acquisition with SEC: 6 deal details
Athenahealth filed a notice with the Securities and Exchange Commission detailing its shareholder vote on its proposed acquisition, according to HIStalk. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

An eye-opening revelation: 4 CIOs on surprising patient population trends
Four CIOs from hospitals and health systems across the country discuss information they've discovered from their respective patient populations and the most surprising revelations. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

UnitedHealth a step ahead of Amazon in EMR game, trading near record highs
Companies streamlining EMR data, including UnitedHealth Group, have traded near record highs, while several medical distributors have seen stocks dip after news of an upcoming Amazon software release that can mine patient health records for data to boost medical supply sales via its online pharmacy, according to Bloomberg. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

CMO / CARE DELIVERY

Leapfrog Group announces 2018 Top Hospitals
Florida, California, New Jersey and Texas each saw 12 or more hospitals named recipients of The Leapfrog Group's 2018 Top Hospitals award, the organization announced Dec. 4. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Joint Commission: 9 ways to prevent flu transmission in hospitals
The Joint Commission is calling on healthcare organizations to help employees understand their responsibility to protect themselves and patients from the flu in a Quick Safety advisory notice released Nov. 28. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

9 things to know about annual CMIO salary
Annual salaries for U.S.-based chief medical information officers range from as high as $329,500 and to as low as $21,500, according to ZipRecruiter, a job search website. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Medical schools became more diverse in 2018
Several underrepresented groups in medicine, including women, black men, and American Indians or Alaska Natives, made gains in representation in U.S. medical schools in 2018, according to data from the Association of American Medical Colleges. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Detroit hospital cited after insects found in ICU
CMS cited Detroit-based DMC Harper University Hospital for several infection control issues, including bugs that were flying around an intensive care unit during a recent inspection, according to The Detroit News. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

U of Wisconsin hospital Legionnaires' patient dies; 5th case identified
One patient with Legionnaires' disease has died at University of Wisconsin Health's University Hospital in Madison, according to WISC-TV. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

NewYork-Presbyterian CEO faces pushback from med students over reluctance to 'Medicare for All'
Medical students from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Weill Cornell Medical College, both in New York City, are pushing back against an op-ed written by the CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, who said "Medicare for All" may not be a viable answer to the United States' care delivery issues. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Firing of St. Louis nurse for violating mandatory flu shot policy sparks protest
A nurse was fired for violating St. Louis-based Mercy Hospital South's policy requiring a flu shot, sparking a protest outside the hospital, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

South Carolina patients may need revaccination after hospital error
Easely and Powdersville, S.C.-based Pediatric Associates will offer free re-immunizations to about 1,800 kids due to a staff member's error, according to The Slate. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

'We have a moral imperative to speak out': 10 questions with the physician leading #ThisIsOurLane
Shot in the throat when he was 17, trauma surgeon Joseph Sakran, MD, has a message for the National Rifle Association: Of course healthcare providers have a role in the discussion around gun control, and they have a responsibility to speak up. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Cost containment, the CFO evolution and more: Q&A with Mayo Clinic CFO Dennis Dahlen
A rapidly changing healthcare industry has left many CFOs struggling to balance their traditional responsibilities with a new set of strategic expectations, and few people understand this balance better than Dennis Dahlen. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

How Novant Health CEO Carl Armato's Type 1 diabetes changed the lives of more than 6,000 patients
Novant Health System President and CEO Carl Armato was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 18 months old. After living with the disease for more than 50 years, he credits diabetes for shaping him as a person and informing his strategy for preventive healthcare. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Michael Dowling: What not to do as a leader
Leading a hospital or health system is an undertaking that is nearly impossible to prepare for, so some of my past columns have offered advice to incoming executives on behaviors that I think are essential to success. Perhaps even more important than the list of things to do are actions that leaders must avoid if they hope to be effective. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

Corner Office: Hackensack Meridian Health co-CEO Robert Garrett on the toughest task every executive faces
As co-CEO of Edison, N.J.-based Hackensack Meridian Health, Robert Garrett knows innovation is essential to success, but also understands that discerning which innovative proposals to support is as important as coming up with ideas in the first place. CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE

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