16 key takeaways from 6 recent telehealth reports

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Telehealth may become a permanent aspect of how patients receive their healthcare. Here are 16 takeaways from six recent reports on telehealth.

The following reports were published by Becker's Hospital Review in the last month:

  1. Sixty-five percent of healthcare leaders said they are facilitating a shift toward virtual care offerings.

  2. Eighty-nine percent of healthcare leaders said they are investing in telehealth.

  3. West Virginia University researchers explored patient trends to decipher the appropriate number of telehealth visits and lengths patients should partake. The study found that regardless of the form telehealth took, telehealth produced positive results in patients who received the services for 51 weeks.

  4. Telehealth visits that lasted a duration of 37 weeks or 38 weeks created mixed or neutral results.

  5. Thirty-five percent of the general public would consider replacing their primary care providers with qualified physicians on-demand via telehealth.

  6. Half of the millennials and Gen Zers surveyed said they would consider replacing their primary physicians with telehealth providers.

  7. Forty-four percent of respondents prefer in-person healthcare visits, followed by a hybrid model of in-person and telehealth visits (42 percent) and telehealth as the primary form of care (15 percent).

  8. Households with higher income levels are more likely to leave their primary care provider for telehealth services, with 45 percent of those with a household income of about $100,000 willing to consider it, followed by 32 percent of those with a household income between $50,000 and $99,000 and 30 percent of those with a household income lower than $50,000.

  9. More than half (53 percent) of all Americans said telehealth appointments are good for asking medical questions, followed by reviewing lab tests (48 percent) and prescription refills (46 percent).

  10. Only 34 percent of respondents said they would use telehealth if they were actually sick and 15 percent if their child is sick.

  11. University of Colorado-Denver researchers analyzed how healthcare businesses perceived the shift to virtual care and its effect on sustainability. Small physician offices had the most negative perception of remote and virtual care and were more likely to believe that telehealth came with negative effects, including a decline in revenue and a threat to sustainability. 

  12. In contrast, medical clinics had a positive perception of remote and virtual care, saying they will support the current business model and that they aren't a threat to sustainability.

  13. Of patients whose first visit was through telehealth, 10.3 percent had an in-person follow-up visit in the next week, compared to 5.9 percent of individuals who had their first visit in person.

  14. In March, 85.5 percent of the survey respondents said telehealth made it easier to get the care they need and 51.6 percent of the survey respondents said telehealth allowed them to visit their physician more often.

  15. More than half (64 percent) of the survey respondents said they would prefer to have parts of their annual physical conducted via telehealth.

  16. Nearly a third (31.3 percent) of the survey respondents said their healthcare costs have decreased since using telehealth.

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