9 stats that show opioid misuse is climbing during the pandemic

The pandemic has changed the daily usage patterns and motivations for use of many Americans who use opioids, according to recent research released by The Recovery Village and Project Opioid. 

The survey garnered responses from 785 Floridians about their drug use pre-pandemic compared to now.

Below are key findings from the survey, which was released Feb. 4.

  • Respondents who reported opioid use were 101 percent more likely to report their use has increased to multiple times a day during the pandemic, 41 percent more likely to report their use has increased to daily and 49 percent more likely to report their use has increased to several times per week.

  • Seventy-four percent of respondents who reported opioid misuse and said they were not seeking treatment said it was because they aren't able to pay for treatment.

  • Respondents who reported opioid use were 189 percent more likely to report being physically dependent on opioids now than they were before the pandemic. This group was also 117 percent more likely to say they're using opioids to treat pain, 77 percent more likely to say they're using opioids to treat mental health symptoms, 49 percent more likely to say their use stems from boredom and 18 percent more likely to say their use stems from stress.

More articles on opioids:
Physician group rejects AMA's claim that the opioid crisis is no longer driven by prescriptions
J&J, McKesson and more may reap billions in opioid settlement tax breaks
McKinsey’s hedge fund affiliate may profit from the firm’s $573M opioid settlement

 

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