Study: Nurse-Directed Protocol Reduces Catheter Use 50%, CAUTIs 70%

A nurse-directed catheter removal protocol was associated with reduced urinary catheter use and lower catheter-associated urinary tract infection rates in a Connecticut hospital, according to a study in the American Journal of Infection Control.


Researchers evaluated the effect of a nurse-directed urinary catheter removal protocol at a 300-bed community teaching hospital in Connecticut. The protocol was linked to the physician's catheter insertion order and included the following:

 


•    Physician documentation of catheter insertion criteria.
•    A device-specific charting module added to physician electronic progress notes.
•    Biweekly unit-specific feedback on catheter use rates and CAUTI rates in a multidisciplinary forum.


Over three years, the hospital reduced overall catheter use 50 percent and reduced CAUTIs 70 percent. However, there was a wide range in reduction between units, with the maternity unit reducing catheter use 4 percent and the telemetry unit reducing use 74 percent.


More Articles on CAUTIs:

8 Hospitals Receive HHS Award for Eliminating Infections
Study: 3-Component Intervention Cuts Urinary Tract Infections 39%
Study: Infection Prevention Bundle Tied to Greater Drop in Infections

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