Nurse assaults could be felony under proposed Wisconsin law

Wisconsin lawmakers proposed a bill that would increase criminal penalties for assaults against nurses, NBC affiliate WEAU reports. 

Currently, nurse assaults are classified as a misdemeanor and can lead to maximum fines of $10,000, up to nine months jail time, or both. The proposed bill would change nurse assaults to a felony, carry a six-year maximum prison sentence and result in up to $10,000 in fines. The bill would apply to all acts of intentional bodily harm against registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and those working under the supervision of a nurse.

A public hearing regarding the proposal was held Sept. 18 at Wisconsin's state capital in Madison.

The proposal's broad terms have been met with hesitation by the Alzheimer's Association and the National Alliance on Mental Illness Wisconsin due to concerns that patients with mental health issues or disabilities could be charged with a felony. Other groups such as the Wisconsin Hospital Association and Glendale-based Ascension Wisconsin are asking that all healthcare providers be included in the proposal.

For statistics regarding nurse workplace violence, click here

More articles on clinical leadership & infection control:
NINR reopens search for director after nurse backlash
Sepsis patients should get blood culture before antibiotics, study suggests 
Flu season may be severe, health officials say

Wisconsin lawmakers proposed a bill that would increase criminal penalties for assaults against nurses, NBC affiliate WEAU reports.

Currently, nurse assaults are classified as a misdemeanor and can lead to maximum fines of $10,000, up to nine months jail time, or both. The proposed bill would change nurse assaults to a felony, carry a six-year maximum prison sentence and result in up to $10,000 in fines. The bill would apply to all acts of intentional bodily harm against registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and those working under the supervision of a nurse.

A public hearing regarding the proposal was held Sept. 18 at Wisconsin's state capital in Madison.

The proposal's broad terms have been met with hesitation by the Alzheimer's Association and the National Alliance on Mental Illness Wisconsin due to concerns that patients with mental health issues or disabilities could be charged with a felony. Other groups such as the Wisconsin Hospital Association and Glendale-based Ascension Wisconsin are asking that all healthcare providers be included in the proposal.

For statistics regarding nurse workplace violence, click here.

© Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2019. Interested in LINKING to or REPRINTING this content? View our policies by clicking here.

 


IC Database-3

Top 40 Articles from the Past 6 Months