Florida physician faces $2.5K fine for hemostat left inside patient

An Ocala, Fla.-based surgeon is facing sanctions from the Florida State Board of Medicine and a $2,500 fine after health officials alleged he left a hemostat inside a patient during a 2016 hernia operation, the Ocala Star-Banner reports.

Five things to know:

1. The state's final order was released July 9 in the case against Kevin Hoddinott, MD, a surgeon specializing in general, vascular and bariatric surgery with Ocala-based Munroe Medical Group.

2. The state and Dr. Hoddinott agreed to a settlement, which includes the board issuing a letter of concern against Dr. Hoddinott's medical license, a $2,500 fine and reimbursement to the state of $1,661.10 for court costs.

The settlement also requires Dr. Hoddinott to attend eight hours of board disciplinary hearings and give a one-hour lecture on "retained foreign body objects" to medical staff at an approved medical facility, the Star-Banner reports.

3. The case against Dr. Hoddinott came from a hernia operation the surgeon performed in February 2016. The Department of Health claims Dr. Hoddinott left a surgical hemostat — a clamp used to control bleeding during surgery — in the patient's abdomen during the procedure.

In October 2016, an X-ray of the patient revealed the hemostat. The original complaint did not say what prompted the X-ray or if the patient had complained of discomfort, according to the Star-Banner. The patient had a second surgery to remove the hemostat a few days after the X-ray.

4. Dr. Hoddinott neither admitted nor denied the allegations from the case, but acknowledged that if the allegations were true, they would violate Florida law and would serve as grounds for disciplinary action by the Board of Medicine, the settlement agreement stated.

5. Dr. Hoddinott's attorney did not comment to the Star-Banner on the case. Dr. Hoddinott had no previous complaints or disciplinary actions prior to this case, according to Florida Department of Health records.

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