Which female physicians earn most?

Male physicians still earn more than their female counterparts in both primary and specialty care — though a survey from Medscape suggests this gap is closing.

The "Medscape Female Physician Compensation Report 2016" indicates female primary care physicians earn an average of $192,000 per year, compared to male PCPs, who earn an average of $225,000 annually. Female specialists earn $242,000 to male specialists' $324,000, according to Medscape.

The good news is women's earnings are growing at a faster pace than men's. Female PCP compensation is up 36 percent in 2016 compared to Medscape's 2012 survey, while male PCP compensation grew 29 percent. Female specialist compensation grew 40 percent compared to 2012, while male specialist compensation grew 34 percent.

Although women in medicine still take home below-average earnings across the board, here is how the specialties rank for female compensation, according to Medscape.

1. Radiology — $342,000
2. Cardiology — $339,000
3. Dermatology — $335,000
4. Anesthesiology — $317,000
5. Gastroenterology — $303,000
6. Oncology — $285,000
7. Emergency medicine — $279,000
8. General surgery — $257,000
9. (tie) OB/Gyn — $256,000
9. (tie) Pathology — $256,000
11. Ophthalmology — $242,000
12. Neurology — $214,000
13. Psychiatry — $205,000
14. Internal medicine — $202,000
15. HIV/Infectious diseases — $200,000
16. Endocrinology — $189,000
17. Family medicine — $183,000
18. Pediatrics — $182,000

 

More articles on compensation:

Criticized for lack of transparency, Blue Shield of California reveals executive pay
20 highest paid healthcare CEOs of S&P 500 companies
Primary care pay grows faster than specialties: 6 findings

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