AAMC: DO school enrollment up 163% since 2002

First-year medical school enrollment has increased 29 percent since the 2002-03 school year, according to a recent report released by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

The report, entitled "Results of the 2017 AAMC Survey of Medical School Enrollment Plans," aims to examine the number and trends in the matriculation of first-year medical school students during the past 10 years and projects first-year matriculation through 2025. The report is based on the results of the 14th annual Survey of Medical School Enrollment Plans, which was administered to the deans of 149 U.S. medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education in November 2017.

Respondents were asked to provide information on their school's first-year matriculants and anticipate the number of matriculants for the next five years. The survey also included questions regarding industry concerns, including graduate medical education placements and diversity.

Here are five findings from the report.

1. In response to a potential physician shortage, the AAMC recommended a 30 percent increase in first-year medical school students by the 2015-16 academic year. Survey results indicate the 30 percent goal will be reached by the 2018-19 school year.

2. Forty-four percent of medical schools reported concern about their incoming students' abilities to find residency positions after completing medical school.

3. Eighty-five percent of respondents expressed concern regarding competition from DO schools and other health professional programs regarding the number of available clinical training sites. More than half (54 percent) of medical schools reported feeling competition specifically from DO schools, while 58 percent said they felt pressure from other healthcare professional programs.

4. Nearly all respondents (99 percent) indicated they have or were planning to create specific programs or policies related to diversity.

5. DO schools saw 8,088 students enroll as first-year students for the 2017-18 academic year, a 163 percent increase from the 2002-03 academic year.

To access the full report, click here.

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