Sutter Health faces class-action lawsuit over pricing: 4 things to know

A class-action lawsuit alleging Sutter Health violated California's antitrust laws by using its market power to overcharge patients is slated to open Sept. 23, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Four things to know:

1. The lawsuit dates back to 2014. Self-funded employers and union trusts initially filed the case, which was later joined with a lawsuit brought in 2018 by California's attorney general.

2. In March, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said a six-year investigation revealed Sutter restricted health insurers from providing consumers with more low-cost health plan options, and the health system set excessively high out-of-network prices. Sutter also allegedly restricted publication of provider cost information, which impeded transparency.

3. Sutter could be liable for as much as $2.7 billion. The plaintiffs are seeking up to $900 million in damages, and that amount can be tripled under California's antitrust law, according to the Los Angeles Times.

4. Sutter denies the allegations. Regarding the lawsuit, a health system spokesperson released the following statement to the Los Angeles Times:

"This lawsuit irresponsibly targets Sutter's integrated system of hospitals, clinics, urgent care centers and affiliated doctors serving millions of patients throughout Northern California. While insurance companies want to sell narrow networks to employers, integrated networks like Sutter's benefit patient care and experience, which leads to greater patient choice and reduces surprise out-of-network bills to our patients."

Access the full Los Angeles Times article here.

More articles on healthcare finance:

Hahnemann closure pushed back
Johns Hopkins All Children's faces record state fines
OIG tags California medical group for erroneous billing

© Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2019. Interested in LINKING to or REPRINTING this content? View our policies by clicking here.

 

Top 40 Articles from the Past 6 Months