CFOs retire at fastest pace in 12 years

CFOs are retiring at a faster pace amid increased job pressures, according to an analysis for The Wall Street Journal.

The analysis is based on examination of 12 years of regulatory filings by Audit Analytics for the newspaper. It showed about 17 percent of departing CFOs at a U.S. public company in 2018 left to retire. That's the fastest pace since at least 2007. 

Experts told the Journal the more complex CFO role and the stock market have contributed to the exodus.

The CFO role is now more strategic. It often includes supervision of functions such as IT and human resources, and these expanding duties have prompted some CFOs to retire, recruiters told the Journal. Others may be retiring to take on advisory opportunities or because they are nearing retirement age.

According to the Journal, the booming stock market has spurred some finance chiefs to retire and cash out restricted equity grants.

Read the full report here.

 

More articles on healthcare finance:

7 quotes from hospital RCM leaders this year
Hahnemann University Hospital's financial challenges and planned closure: a timeline
What one expert wants newer billers to know about coding maternity and delivery services

© Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2021. Interested in LINKING to or REPRINTING this content? View our policies by clicking here.

 

Featured Whitepapers

Featured Webinars