Today's Top 20 Stories
  1. Olympus to pay Virginia Mason $6.6M for role in superbug outbreak: 7 things to know

    Jurors on Monday ordered Olympus to pay Seattle-based Virginia Mason Medical Center $6.6 million in damages related to a superbug outbreak that began in 2012. The Tokyo-based devicemaker was also ordered to pay $1 million to a deceased patient's family, according to the Los Angeles Times.  By Brian Zimmerman -
  2. How son's lymphoma diagnosis and an injury impacted Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini's views on healthcare

    Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini said two life-threatening medical challenges shaped his views on U.S. healthcare: his son's cancer diagnosis and a spinal cord injury he suffered after a skiing accident.  By Alyssa Rege -
  3. Patient struck and killed on freeway after fleeing from California hospital

    A patient fled Laguna Hills, Calif.-based Saddleback Regional Medical Center early Sunday morning and was killed running across the freeway, according to the Orange County Register.  By Alia Paavola -

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  1. 7 insights into remote patient monitoring

    Here are seven things to know about how remote patient monitoring can be used to improve clinical outcomes in healthcare.  By Jessica Kim Cohen -
  2. CHIME to conduct 'Health Care's Most Wired' survey

    The College of Healthcare Information Management Executives will now administer the annual "Health Care's Most Wired" survey.  By Jessica Kim Cohen -
  3. Study: 4 reasons patients value reading physician notes

    Many patients whose providers adopt OpenNotes — a project in which providers share medical notes with their patients — report the option is helpful, according to recent research out of Boston-based Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.  By Jessica Kim Cohen -
  4. House 2018 budget proposal would ask HHS to consider patient matching

    The U.S. House Committee on Appropriations' report on its proposed fiscal year 2018 Labor, Health and Human Services and Education funding bill requests HHS investigate patient matching.  By Jessica Kim Cohen -

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  1. Molina Healthcare to eliminate about 1,400 jobs: 6 things to know

    Long Beach, Calif.-based Molina Healthcare is poised to cut roughly 1,400 positions over the next few months, according to an internal company memo obtained by Reuters.  By Morgan Haefner -
  2. Missouri hospital to close by Sept. 22

    Fulton (Mo.) Medical Center, the only hospital in its county, will close no later than Sept. 22, according to a St. Louis Post-Dispatch report.  By Molly Gamble -
  3. 100 community hospital CIOs to know | 2017

    Becker's Healthcare is proud to present its first edition of 100 Community Hospital CIOs to Know.  By Staff -
  4. Wyoming hospital at risk of losing Medicare, Medicaid funding

    Cheyenne (Wyo.) Regional Medical Center could lose its Medicare and Medicaid contracts after a survey by the Wyoming Department of Health found deficiencies, according to the Casper Star Tribune.  By Ayla Ellison -

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  1. Patient stabs University of Nebraska Medical Center employee

    A 37-year-old man was arrested Friday after police say he attacked a phlebotomist at University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, according to WOWT.  By Ayla Ellison -
  2. Financial concerns prompt Johns Hopkins-owned hospital to eliminate staff through buyouts

    Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., which is owned by Baltimore-based Johns Hopkins Medicine, is seeking to close a projected budget gap through voluntary employee buyouts, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post.  By Ayla Ellison -
  3. Better patient experience linked to lower mortality

    Readmission rates and patient satisfaction are good measures of quality, according to a recent study conducted by researchers from Boston-based M.I.T. and Nashville, Tenn.-based Vanderbilt University.  By Emily Rappleye -
  4. Healthcare executive gets nearly 10 years in prison for $56.5M fraud scheme

    Sreedhar Potarazu, MD, founder, president and CEO of McLean, Va.-based VitalSpring Technology, was sentenced July 19 to 119 months and 29 days in prison for defrauding VitalSpring's shareholders and failing to pay employment taxes, according to the Department of Justice.  By Ayla Ellison -
  5. Tennessee hospital to reopen in August

    The only hospital in Scott County, Tenn., will reopen Aug. 8.  By Ayla Ellison -
  6. 8 former CBO directors address criticisms of healthcare projections

    All eight former directors of the Congressional Budget Office wrote a letter to Congressional leaders defending their projections against criticisms from Republicans and the Trump administration.  By Emily Rappleye -
  7. Moody's analyzes financial risks of EMR implementation: 6 findings

    EMRs are essential components to delivering quality patient care and accurate billing statements. However, problems with new system installation can cause significant operating losses, lower patient volumes and receivables write-offs, negatively impacting the hospital's operating margin and credit quality, according to a new analysis conducted by Moody's Investors Service.  By Alia Paavola -
  8. Senate parliamentarian flags issues with GOP healthcare bill: 4 things to know

    Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough noted Friday three key provisions of the Senate's healthcare bill violate the chamber's rules, according to The New York Times.  By Emily Rappleye -
  9. Analysis: Hospital's reputation isn't always reliable indicator of quality of surgical care

    Some U.S. hospitals consistently included on lists for top overall performance and patient safety do not provide the highest quality care for certain surgical procedures, according to an analysis by MPIRICA, a startup focused on quality transparency in the healthcare industry.  By Alia Paavola -

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