28 Statistics: How Physicians and Administrators Perceive Physician Satisfaction

In a recent Physician Wellness Services/Cejka survey, physicians and healthcare administrators were asked to review cultural attributes and rate how important they felt each attribute is to physicians' satisfaction on a 10-point scale, with 10 representing "extremely important."

Eighty-six percent of the physicians who were surveyed are full-time employees. They are employed by hospitals or practice in a single-specialty practice, academic medical center or multi-specialty practice.

The administrator survey pool includes vice presidents or directors, physician recruiters, human resource managers (12.2 percent) and presidents and CEOs (10.6 percent). Settings include hospitals, health systems, multi-specialty practices and single-specialty practices.

Here is a comparison of physicians' and administrators' perspectives on what the most important cultural factors for physician satisfaction are.  

Physicians
8.6 — Communication is respectful.
8.5 — My organization has a focus on patient-centered care.
8.5 — The management approach is supportive (e.g., non-punitive or non-retaliatory) regarding errors and mistakes.
8.4 — Communication is transparent.
8.3 — My organization has open dialogue across roles.
8.2 — My organization has a team-focused environment.
8.2 — Leadership style is collaborative.
8.1 — My organization has clearly defined accountability across roles.
8.1 — My organization adapts to change readily.
8.0 — Compensation plans are structured to award performance in a way consistent with our stated mission and values.
8.0 — Leadership provides clear performance expectations.
7.9 — My organization has an innovative approach to care.
7.5 — My organization has a clearly stated mission and values.
7.4 — Leadership provides objective performance evaluations.

Administrators
8.7 — Communication is respectful.
8.7 — Communication is transparent.
8.5 — My organization has a team-focused environment.
8.5 — My organization has a focus on patient-centered care.
8.4 — Leadership style is collaborative.
8.4 — My organization has open dialogue across roles.
8.3 — The management approach is supportive (e.g., non-punitive or non-retaliatory) regarding errors and mistakes.
8.0 — My organization has an innovative approach to care.
7.9 — Leadership provides clear performance expectations.
7.7 — My organization has a clearly stated mission and values.
7.7 — My organization adapts to change readily.
7.7 — My organization has clearly-defined accountability across roles.
7.7 — Compensation plans are structured to award performance in a way that is consistent with our stated mission and values.
7.4 — Leadership provides objective performance evaluations.

More from the survey can be found here.

More Articles on Hospital Culture:

6 Tips to Engage, Retain and Recruit Physicians
Study: Team Training Can Enhance Hospitals' Safety Culture
3 Sure-Fire Ways to Kill a Patient-Centered Culture






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