Report: Decreasing Potentially Preventable Hospital Admissions Saves Nearly $1B

Share on Facebook
The decrease in the number of potentially preventable hospital admissions from 2005 to 2010 saved nearly $1 billion in hospital costs, according to a Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project statistical brief.

The brief, "Trends in Potentially Preventable Hospital Admissions among Adults and Children, 2005-2010," examines data from the HCUP 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Prevention Quality Indicators. PQI rates and hospital inpatient discharge data can identify hospital admissions that could potentially be avoided with outpatient and preventive care.


Sign up for our FREE E-Weekly for more coverage like this sent to your inbox!

Here are some key data points from the brief:

•    The number of potentially preventable hospital admissions for adults decreased 6.2 percent from 2005 to 2010, lowering costs 2 percent, from $32.6 billion to $31.9 billion.
•    The number of potentially preventable hospital admissions for children decreased nearly 40 percent from 2005 to 2010, generating a 32 percent reduction in related costs, from $941 million to $644 million.
•    The largest decreases in potentially preventable hospital admission rates between 2005 and 2010 occurred in the following conditions, decreasing hospital costs more than 10 percent:
-angina without a procedure — 50 percent
-dehydration — 38 percent
-bacterial pneumonia — 30 percent
-congestive heart failure — 21 percent
•    From 2005 to 2010, the rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions for short-term diabetes complications increased 23 percent, raising hospital costs 32 percent.
•    The rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions for hypertension increased 33 percent from 2005 to 2010, increasing costs 62 percent.

More Articles on Hospital Admissions:

Cleveland Quality Initiative Saves $20.1M From Reduced Hospitalizations
Lawrence Memorial Hospital, University of Kansas Partner on Readmission Reduction

Study: Evidence for Care Transition Strategies Provides Little Guidance

© Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2014. Interested in LINKING to or REPRINTING this content? View our policies by clicking here.

 

New From Becker's Infection Control & Clinical Quality

A child medication error occurs every 8 minutes

Read Now


Patient Safety Tools & Resources Database