3 clinical leaders on their proudest moments amid the pandemic: A look back

A little more than a year after the pandemic hit the U.S., three clinical leaders reflected back on their proudest moments.

Jim Keller, MD. CMO at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital (Park Ridge, Ill.): My proudest moments are twofold. Our front-line caregivers were focused on providing great care in an uncertain environment, utilizing constantly evolving therapies to optimize outcomes when treating a disease with many unique characteristics. These providers did this while faced with the same health, financial, family and social issues we all faced. My second moment is to remain in awe of the development and ultimate distribution of an effective vaccine. To see some of our providers transition from caring for COVID-19 patients to vaccinating their fellow team members was one of the most gratifying moments in my career.

Deana Sievert, DNP, RN. Chief Nursing Officer at ProMedica Acute Care (Toledo, Ohio) and President of ProMedica Memorial Hospital and Fostoria (Ohio) Community Hospital: I am most proud of our clinical team's determination this past year. Clinicians from all over our enterprise were determined to ensure all of our patients, COVID-diagnosed or not, would receive the highest-quality care we always strive to provide. Whether that meant temporarily moving into a different care unit, a different hospital, or a different genre of care, they each stepped up to get the necessary training and pitch in where needed. We were able to effectively manage the pandemic in our facilities thanks to the commitment of our compassionate clinicians. I cannot share enough how thankful I am for each of them and how very proud I am of them!

Debi Pasley, RN. System Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer at Christus Health (Irving, Texas): Walking among our caregivers when we visit our ministries has provided an unending supply of proudest moments. The one which stands out most, though, is from a recent visit to Christus Santa Rosa Hospital-San Marcos (Texas). I watched as a nurse assisted a family member don personal protective equipment to visit their loved one who was critically ill with COVID-19. I mentioned how proud I was that they were advocating for their patients and families in this way, and the reply was that it was so much better for their patients to have families offer support and comfort.

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