13 Recent Infection Control Findings

Here are 13 findings on infection control in the past month, beginning with the most recent.

1. Using cloth towels to clean hospital rooms may be insufficient to remove microbial contaminants, according to a study in the American Journal of Infection Control.



2. A scoring system using five variables can accurately categorize patients with Clostridium difficile infection by their predicted response to therapy, according to a study in BMC Infectious Diseases.

3. While the rate of healthcare-associated infections in patients after a major cancer surgery increased from 1999 to 2009, the HAI-associated mortality rate decreased, according to a study in Cancer.

4. Michigan hospitals, which began an initiative to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2007, reduced CAUTI rates significantly more than hospitals in other states, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine.

5. Educating patients and their families about the dangers of keeping urinary catheters in patients can aid efforts to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine.

6. The global infection control market is expected to grow approximately 6 percent annually from $10.5 billion in 2012 to $14 billion by 2017, according to a MarketsandMarkets report.

7. Escherichia coli sequence type ST131, an antibiotic-resistant strain of E. coli, is associated with long-term care facilities and older patients, according to a study in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

8. Nearly one-third of antimicrobial use among chronic hemodialysis patients is inappropriate, according to a study in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

9. Complying with perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis standards may not reduce surgical site infections, according to a study in the American Journal of Infection Control.

10. Healthcare staff generally have a poor technical understanding of the infection Clostridium difficile, according to a study in the American Journal of Infection Control.

11. An increase of efforts to prevent Clostridium difficile infections at healthcare organizations has yielded limited progress, according to a survey by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.

12. Researchers have identified six risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection relapse, according to a study in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

13. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae have grown more resistant to last-resort antibiotics over the past 10 years.

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