12% of Americans know someone who's died of COVID-19

Anuja Vaidya (Twitter) - Print  | 

About 12 percent of Americans say they know someone who has died from the new coronavirus, according to a new Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index poll.

The poll is conducted weekly. Results are from the sixth wave of the poll, conducted April 24-27, and include responses from 1,021 U.S. adults.

Eight survey findings:

1. Twenty-six percent of respondents said they know someone who has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, and 15 percent said they know someone who tried to get tested but was turned away.

2. About 10 percent of respondents said they had a "great deal" of confidence in the federal government to look out for their and their family's best interests during the pandemic, compared to 19 percent of respondents who said the same about their state government.

3. Twenty-four percent of respondents said they were "extremely" concerned and another 24 percent said they were "very" concerned about their community reopening too soon.

4. Twenty-six percent said they were not willing to risk their health or their families' health and well-being to return to their life before the coronavirus pandemic.

5. About 61 percent of respondents report being "extremely" or "very" concerned about the U.S. economy collapsing during the pandemic.

6. About 49 percent of respondents said they have received stimulus money from the government; 14 percent said they spent the money on their rent; 38 percent said they saved it.

7. Forty-three percent of respondents said that they wear a mask at all times when leaving the house; 67 percent said they are maintaining a distance of at least 6 feet from other people.

8. Sixty-four percent of respondents said their mental health has not changed from last week; 28 percent reported that it has worsened.

More articles on public health:
Most states not testing enough to safely reopen, analysis suggests
Healthcare Heroes Project spotlights COVID-19 stories from the front lines
COVID-19 deaths in US likely much higher than reported in early weeks of pandemic, new analysis finds

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