1 in 4 pre-Medicare adults don't think they can afford insurance next year

One in 4 Americans approaching Medicare eligibility said they have little or no confidence about their ability to afford health insurance during the next year, according to the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging.

In October 2018, the Ann Arbor-based university surveyed a national sample of adults age 50-64 about their plans for health insurance, medical care and employment in the future. Nearly half of the respondents weren't confident they could afford health insurance when they retire.

In addition, 11 percent of adults said they considered forgoing health insurance in the last year, with 5 percent of respondents deciding to not purchase health insurance. In terms of medical care, 13 percent of adults said they didn't seek medical care because of cost.

"Regardless of potential federal policy changes, patients and their healthcare providers should discuss the out-of-pocket costs of healthcare, such as medical procedures, tests, or medications. Such discussions can help inform decisions about their health insurance options and the timing, choice, and appropriateness of healthcare services," according to the poll.

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