Stanford Health Care to nurses: No pay for those who strike

Stanford Health Care and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital administrators have notified union leaders that its nurse members who strike later in April risk losing pay and health benefits, according to Palo Alto Weekly.

The Committee for Recognition of Nursing Achievement, a union at Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children's Health that represents about 5,000 nurses, has scheduled a strike to begin April 25. The nurses' contract expired March 31.

If the strike moves forward, Stanford Health Care and the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, both based in Palo Alto, Calif., are prepared to continue to provide safe, quality healthcare, according to a statement from Dale Beatty, DNP, RN, chief nurse executive and vice president of patient care services for Stanford Health Care, and Jesus Cepero, PhD, RN, senior vice president of patient care and chief nursing officer for Stanford Children's Health.

But the statement, which was shared with Becker's, said nurses who choose to strike will not be paid for shifts they miss.

"In addition, employer-paid health benefits will cease on May 1 for nurses who go out on strike and remain out through the end of the month in which the strike begins," Drs. Beatty and Cepero said.

The leaders quoted from Committee for Recognition of Nursing Achievement's "contingency manual" that the union provided to nurses: "If a strike lasts beyond the end of the month in which it begins and the hospitals discontinue medical coverage, you will have the option to pay for continued coverage."

Drs. Beatty and Cepero said nurses who strike may pay to continue their health coverage through the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act.

In a separate statement shared with Becker's, Committee for Recognition of Nursing Achievement President Colleen Borges called Stanford and Packard management's move regarding nurses' health benefits "cruel" and "immoral."

"Health benefits should not be used against workers, especially against the very healthcare professionals who have made Stanford a world-class health system," said Ms. Borges, who is also a pediatric oncology nurse at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. "We have spent our careers caring for others and putting others first — now more than ever we need solutions that will ensure sustainability, safe staffing and strong benefits to retain nurses. But instead of taking our proposals seriously, hospitals are spending their time and energy weaponizing our medical benefits. We refuse to be intimidated from standing up for the fair contracts that we need in order to continue delivering world-class patient care."

The union has organized a petition to tell Stanford not to cut off medical benefits for nurses and their families during the strike. As of April 19, the petition had more than 25,150 signatures.

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