5 must-reads for healthcare leaders this week

Culture. Productivity. Strategy. Execution. These ideas will never go out of style for hospital and health system leaders.

The following leadership articles were published by Becker's Hospital Review in the last week.

1. 3 ways hospitals can strengthen their operating margins amid ACA uncertainty
Hospital leaders must remain vigilant in their goal to provide high-quality, affordable care, regardless of what happens in Washington, D.C. Despite President Donald Trump's and Republicans' failed attempt to pass an ACA repeal and replacement bill March 24, it is likely Republican leaders will continue to seek changes to the ACA as it was passed and interpreted under the previous administration.

2. Raising the nation's 'guts quotient' — 5 thoughts on the future of healthcare from Cleveland Clinic CEO Dr. Toby Cosgrove
When Delos "Toby" Cosgrove, MD, president and CEO of Cleveland Clinic, was a high school junior, his father took him to visit a family friend who was a college professor. "Naturally, the conversation turned into, 'What do we need to do to get Toby into college,'" Dr. Cosgrove told the audience during a keynote at Becker's Hospital Review's 8th Annual Meeting in Chicago. The professor said he was not interested in Dr. Cosgrove's IQ, but rather his GQ — a term that neither Dr. Cosgrove nor his father had heard before.

3. New graduate nurses: How to sell yourself with no experience
The hardest part of getting that first nursing job is convincing someone you have what it takes without having the experience to back it up. Hiring and orienting new graduate nurses is very expensive. How do you convince a healthcare organization to take a risk on hiring you?

4. Word from the C-suite: 'Team-based collaboration is essential to the future of our functioning healthcare system'
For one C-suite executive, the intersection of technology and medicine will become a crucial part of the healthcare industry in the next few years, if not sooner. To use that technology effectively, medical professionals from all disciplines must learn to work together for the benefit of the patient.

5. Study: Executives who flatter CEOs most also develop greatest resentment for them
While CEOs may like to hear their top executives sing their praises, a recent study suggests they may want to be wary of managers who never voice dissenting opinions.

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