Barnes-Jewish Hospital | 100 Great Hospitals in America 2015

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Barnes-Jewish Hospital (St. Louis). Robert Barnes, for whom the hospital was named, arrived in St. Louis in 1830 without a dollar in his pocket. After rising to the president position at a bank, he died in 1892 and bestowed $850,000 to the city to build a "modern general hospital for sick and injured persons, without distinction of creed." The product of Mr. Barnes' will became Barnes Hospital, which opened in 1914 and became one of the first medical teaching centers in the U.S. In 1996, Barnes-Jewish Hospital was created through the merger of Barnes Hospital and The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis.

Barnes-Jewish Hospital, the flagship hospital of the St. Louis-based BJC Healthcare system, has been included on U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll for 22 consecutive years, and in 2014 was ranked No. 1 in St. Louis and in Missouri with 13 nationally ranked medical specialties. The 1,310-bed general medical and surgical facility is also Magnet-accredited.

Barnes-Jewish Hospital serves as the primary teaching hospital of Washington University in St. Louis. The two institutions have together led premier programs and initiatives. The Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine is the only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in Missouri. The center offers a multidisciplinary team of more than 300 leading clinicians and medical researchers. The Barnes-Jewish and Washington University Heart & Vascular Center is known for pioneering many procedures, including ablation therapies, valve repair and replacement, as well as permanent implantation of ventricular assist devices.

Barnes-Jewish-Hospital

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