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Survey: Physician Shortage Hits Critical Level in NY

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The physician shortage in New York State is reaching critical levels, as the state currently needs more than 1,200 physicians, according to the results of Healthcare Association of New York State's 2012 Physician Advocacy Survey.

According to the report, the Association of American Medical Colleges predicts the nation will be short 46,000 primary care physicians by 2020, and New York State is currently experiencing the problem.

The following are some key findings from the report:

•    Of the more than 1,200 physicians needed in New York, 374 of those are primary care physicians
•    56 percent of respondents said primary care physicians are difficult to recruit
•    32 percent of hospitals had to either reduce or eliminate hospital services because of the physician shortage
•    75 percent of emergency departments had no coverage for certain specialties due to the shortage, excluding the Nassau-Suffolk region.

A total of 110 HANYS members responded to the survey, and the results describe the physician climate for New York State, outside of New York City.

More Articles on the Physician Shortage:

Lee Memorial Health System to Launch Residency Program
Physician Assistants Fight for Increased Practice Rights in Kentucky
AAFP Report: Increase Primary Care Compensation to Combat Physician Shortage

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